IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/ifprid/1395.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Analysis of agricultural public expenditures in Nigeria: Examination at the federal, state, and local government levels:

Author

Listed:
  • Olomola, Aderbigbe
  • Mogues, Tewodaj
  • Olofinbiyi, Tolulope
  • Nwoko, Chinedum
  • Udoh, Edet
  • Alabi, Reuben Adeolu
  • Onu, Justice
  • Woldeyohannes, Sileshi

Abstract

The level of public spending on agriculture in Nigeria remains low regardless of the indicator used. Agricultural spending as a share of total federal spending averaged 4.6 percent between 2008 and 2012 and has been trending downward precipitously. In contrast, Nigeria recorded an annual average agricultural growth rate of more than 6 percent between 2003 and 2010, and agricultural gross domestic product followed an increasing trend between 2008 and 2012. Budgetary allocation to agriculture compared with other key sectors is also low despite the sector’s role in the fight against poverty, hunger, and unemployment and in the pursuit of economic development. Public investment has been stifled by the lopsided manner in which national revenue is being allocated among the three tiers of government that have responsibility for agricultural development.

Suggested Citation

  • Olomola, Aderbigbe & Mogues, Tewodaj & Olofinbiyi, Tolulope & Nwoko, Chinedum & Udoh, Edet & Alabi, Reuben Adeolu & Onu, Justice & Woldeyohannes, Sileshi, 2014. "Analysis of agricultural public expenditures in Nigeria: Examination at the federal, state, and local government levels:," IFPRI discussion papers 1395, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1395
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cdm15738.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/128804/filename/129015.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fan, C. Simon & Lin, Chen & Treisman, Daniel, 2009. "Political decentralization and corruption: Evidence from around the world," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 14-34, February.
    2. Mogues, Tewodaj & Morris, Michael & Freinkman, Lev & Adubi, Abimbola & Simeon, Ehui & Nwoko, Chinedum & Taiwo, Olufemi & Nege, Caroline & Okonji, Patrick & Chete, Louis, 2008. "Agricultural public spending in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 789, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Mogues, Tewodaj & Yu, Bingxin & Fan, Shenggen & Mcbride, Linden, 2012. "The impacts of public investment in and for agriculture: Synthesis of the existing evidence," IFPRI discussion papers 1217, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Akramov, Kamiljon T., 2009. "Decentralization, agricultural services and determinants of input use in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 941, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Erwin H Tiongson & Hamid R Davoodi & Sawitree S. Asawanuchit, 2003. "How Useful Are Benefit Incidence Analyses of Public Education and Health Spending," IMF Working Papers 03/227, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda & Kuku, Oluyemisi & Ajibola, Akeem, 2011. "Review of literature on agricultural productivity, social capital and food security in Nigeria:," NSSP working papers 21, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agriculture; public expenditure; Agricultural policies;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1395. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.