IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fpr/ifprid/1395.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Analysis of agricultural public expenditures in Nigeria: Examination at the federal, state, and local government levels:

Author

Listed:
  • Olomola, Aderbigbe
  • Mogues, Tewodaj
  • Olofinbiyi, Tolulope
  • Nwoko, Chinedum
  • Udoh, Edet
  • Alabi, Reuben Adeolu
  • Onu, Justice
  • Woldeyohannes, Sileshi

Abstract

The level of public spending on agriculture in Nigeria remains low regardless of the indicator used. Agricultural spending as a share of total federal spending averaged 4.6 percent between 2008 and 2012 and has been trending downward precipitously. In contrast, Nigeria recorded an annual average agricultural growth rate of more than 6 percent between 2003 and 2010, and agricultural gross domestic product followed an increasing trend between 2008 and 2012. Budgetary allocation to agriculture compared with other key sectors is also low despite the sector’s role in the fight against poverty, hunger, and unemployment and in the pursuit of economic development. Public investment has been stifled by the lopsided manner in which national revenue is being allocated among the three tiers of government that have responsibility for agricultural development.

Suggested Citation

  • Olomola, Aderbigbe & Mogues, Tewodaj & Olofinbiyi, Tolulope & Nwoko, Chinedum & Udoh, Edet & Alabi, Reuben Adeolu & Onu, Justice & Woldeyohannes, Sileshi, 2014. "Analysis of agricultural public expenditures in Nigeria: Examination at the federal, state, and local government levels:," IFPRI discussion papers 1395, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1395
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://cdm15738.contentdm.oclc.org/utils/getfile/collection/p15738coll2/id/128804/filename/129015.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rosario G. Manasan & Janet S. Cuenca & Eden C. Villanueva, 2007. "Benefit Incidence of Public Spending on Education in the Philippines," Governance Working Papers 21930, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Akramov, Kamiljon T., 2009. "Decentralization, agricultural services and determinants of input use in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 941, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Sawitree S. Asawanuchit & Mr. Hamid R Davoodi & Mr. Erwin H Tiongson, 2003. "How Useful Are Benefit Incidence Analyses of Public Education and Health Spending," IMF Working Papers 2003/227, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Mogues, Tewodaj & Yu, Bingxin & Fan, Shenggen & Mcbride, Linden, 2012. "The impacts of public investment in and for agriculture: Synthesis of the existing evidence," IFPRI discussion papers 1217, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Fan, C. Simon & Lin, Chen & Treisman, Daniel, 2009. "Political decentralization and corruption: Evidence from around the world," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(1-2), pages 14-34, February.
    6. Mogues, Tewodaj & Morris, Michael & Freinkman, Lev & Adubi, Abimbola & Simeon, Ehui & Nwoko, Chinedum & Taiwo, Olufemi & Nege, Caroline & Okonji, Patrick & Chete, Louis, 2008. "Agricultural public spending in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 789, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda & Kuku, Oluyemisi & Ajibola, Akeem, 2011. "Review of literature on agricultural productivity, social capital and food security in Nigeria:," NSSP working papers 21, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Mogues, Tewodaj & Olofinbiyi, Tolulope, 2020. "Budgetary influence under information asymmetries: Evidence from Nigeria’s subnational agricultural investments," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).
    2. Olofinbiyi, Tolulope & Mogues, Tewodaj, 2017. "Who Influences Government Spending in Agriculture? The Roles of Public Actors in Subnational Funding Allocation in Nigeria," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 259572, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).
    3. Nwoko, Chinedum & Ikejiofor, Amarachi Grace & Nnaji, Nchedo Theresa & Mogues, Tewodaj, 2018. "Federal government support for agriculture in Nigeria: Analysis with a public expenditure lens," NSSP working papers 57, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Mavrotas, George & Mogues, Tewodaj & Oyeyemi, Motunrayo & Smart, Jenny & Xiong, Zhe, 2018. "Agricultural public expenditures, sector performance, and welfare in Nigeria: A state-level analysis," NSSP working papers 60, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Mogues, Tewodaj & Olofinbiyi Tolulope, 2017. "Institutions And Public Agricultural Investments: A Qualitative Study Of State And Local Government Spending In Nigeria," Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security Policy Research Papers 259576, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Food Security (FSP).

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Aderibigbe Olomola & Tewodaj Mogues & Tolulope Olofinbiyi & Chinedum Nwoko & Edet Udoh & Reuben Alabi & Justice Onu & Sileshi Woldeyohannes, 2014. "Agriculture Public Expenditure Review at the Federal and Subnational Levels in Nigeria (2008-12)," World Bank Publications - Reports 22345, The World Bank Group.
    2. Kausik K. Bhadra, 2016. "Inequality Effects of Fiscal Policy: Analysing the Benefit Incidence on Health Sector in India," Working Papers id:8433, eSocialSciences.
    3. Janet S. Cuenca, 2008. "Benefit Incidence Analysis of Public Spending on Education in the Philippines : A Methodological Note," Development Economics Working Papers 22627, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    4. Mogues, Tewodaj & Erman, Alvina, 2016. "Institutional arrangements to make public spending responsive to the poor—(where) have they worked?: Review of the evidence on four major intervention types," IFPRI discussion papers 1519, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    5. Runu Bhatka, 2016. "Educational Attainment of Young Adults in India: Measures, Trends and Determinants," Working Papers id:8435, eSocialSciences.
    6. Chakraborty, Lekha & Singh, Yadawendra & Jacob, Jannet Farida, 2012. "Public Expenditure Benefit Incidence on Health: Selective Evidence from India," Working Papers 12/111, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    7. Mogues, Tewodaj, 2012. "What determines public expenditure allocations?: A review of theories, and implications for agricultural public investments," IFPRI discussion papers 1216, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    8. Emmanuel Olatunbosun Benjamin & Oreoluwa Ola & Hannes Lang & Gertrud Buchenrieder, 2021. "Public-private cooperation and agricultural development in Sub-Saharan Africa: a review of Nigerian growth enhancement scheme and e-voucher program," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 13(1), pages 129-140, February.
    9. Cao, Chunfang & Li, Xiaoyang & Xia, Changyuan, 2021. "The complicit role of local government authorities in corporate bribery: Evidence from a tax collection reform in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C).
    10. Galletta, Sergio, 2017. "Law enforcement, municipal budgets and spillover effects: Evidence from a quasi-experiment in Italy," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 90-105.
    11. John E. Anderson, 2014. "Informal Payments to the Tax Collector in Transition Countries," Ekonomi-tek - International Economics Journal, Turkish Economic Association, vol. 3(2), pages 1-26, May.
    12. Liu, Ye & An, Yunbi & Zhang, Jinqing, 2016. "Bribe payments under regulatory decentralization: Evidence from rights offering regulations in China," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 61-75.
    13. Krisztina Kis-Katos & Günther G. Schulze, 2013. "Corruption in Southeast Asia: a survey of recent research," Asian-Pacific Economic Literature, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University, vol. 27(1), pages 79-109, May.
    14. Hu, Juncheng, 2021. "Do facilitation payments affect earnings management? Evidence from China," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    15. Muhammad Akram & Faheem Jehangir Khan, 2007. "Public Provision of Education and Government Spending in Pakistan," PIDE-Working Papers 2007:40, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics.
    16. Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza & Lessmann, Christian & Markwardt, Gunther, 2018. "Natural resource rents and internal conflicts: Can decentralization lift the curse?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 186-205.
    17. I. Chatterjee & R. Ray, 2012. "Does the evidence on corruption depend on how it is measured? Results from a cross-country study on microdata sets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(25), pages 3215-3227, September.
    18. Désirée Teobaldelli, 2011. "Federalism and the shadow economy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 146(3), pages 269-289, March.
    19. Joan Rosselló Villalonga, 2018. "Fiscal centralization: a remedy for corruption?," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 457-474, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agriculture; public expenditure; Agricultural policies;
    All these keywords.

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1395. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ifprius.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.