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Benefit Incidence of Public Spending on Education in the Philippines


  • Rosario G. Manasan


  • Janet S. Cuenca
  • Eden C. Villanueva-Ruiz


Government education spending is expected to improve the well-being of beneficiaries and enhance their capability to earn income in the future. In this sense, directing education expenditures to the poor holds a promise for breaking the inter-generational transmission of poverty. Given this perspective, the paper addresses the question : to what extent has the poor benefited from government spending on education? In particular, it uses benefit incidence analysis to evaluate whether expenditures on education had redistributive impact.

Suggested Citation

  • Rosario G. Manasan & Janet S. Cuenca & Eden C. Villanueva-Ruiz, 2008. "Benefit Incidence of Public Spending on Education in the Philippines," Development Economics Working Papers 22660, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22660

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. David Coady & Margaret Grosh & John Hoddinott, 2004. "Targeting of Transfers in Developing Countries : Review of Lessons and Experience," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14902.
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    Cited by:

    1. Janet S. Cuenca, 2008. "Benefit Incidence Analysis of Public Spending on Education in the Philippines : A Methodological Note," Development Economics Working Papers 22627, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    2. Zahid Asghar & Mudassar Zahra, 2012. "A Benefit Incidence Analysisof Public Spending on Education in PakistanUsing PSLM Data," Lahore Journal of Economics, Department of Economics, The Lahore School of Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 111-136, July-Dec.

    More about this item


    benefit incidence analysis; targeting; Gini Coefficient; Concentration Coefficient; concentration curve; education; poverty reduction;

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs


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