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Public Expenditure Benefit Incidence on Health: Selective Evidence from India

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  • Chakraborty, Lekha

    () (National Institute of Public Finance and Policy)

  • Singh, Yadawendra
  • Jacob, Jannet Farida

Abstract

Effectiveness of public spending still remains relatively an elusive empirical issue. This preliminary analysis is an attempt on the topic, using benefit incidence methodology, at the subnational government level in health sector of India. The results revealed public health system is `seemingly' more equitable in a few States, while a regressivity in pattern of utilization of public health care services is observed in other States. Both these evidences were to be considered with caution, as the underdeveloped market for private inpatient care in some states might be the factor for disproportionate crowding-in of inpatients, which made the public health care system looked `seemingly' more equitable. However, the `voting with feet' to better private services seems evident only for the affordable higher income quintiles. Results also suggest that polarization is distinctly evident in the public provisioning of heath care services, more related to the in-patient services than the ambulatory services.

Suggested Citation

  • Chakraborty, Lekha & Singh, Yadawendra & Jacob, Jannet Farida, 2012. "Public Expenditure Benefit Incidence on Health: Selective Evidence from India," Working Papers 12/111, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:npf:wpaper:12/111
    Note: Working Paper 111, 2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lekha Chakraborty, 2016. "Asia; A Survey of Gender Budgeting Efforts," IMF Working Papers 16/150, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Hakhu, Antra Bhatt, 2015. "Productive Public Expenditure and Debt Dynamics: An Error Correction Representation using Indian Data," Working Papers 15/149, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.
    3. repec:spr:qualqt:v:52:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s11135-017-0475-x is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Uzochukwu Amakom, 2016. "Nigeria’s Government Spending on Basic Education and Healthcare in the Last Decade: What has Changed After Reforms?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 1085-1102, July.
    5. Runu Bhatka, 2016. "Educational Attainment of Young Adults in India: Measures, Trends and Determinants," Working Papers id:8435, eSocialSciences.
    6. Kausik K. Bhadra, 2016. "Inequality Effects of Fiscal Policy: Analysing the Benefit Incidence on Health Sector in India," Working Papers id:8433, eSocialSciences.
    7. Bhadra, Kaushik K., 2015. "Inequality Effects of Fiscal Policy: Analysing the Benefit Incidence on Health Sector in India," Working Papers 15/158, National Institute of Public Finance and Policy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Effectiveness of public spending ; Benefit incidence;

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality

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