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Individual Tax Rates and Regional Tax Revenues: A Cross-State Analysis

Listed author(s):
  • Hakan Yilmazkuday

    (Department of Economics, Florida International University)

This paper analyzes the effects of state-level personal tax rates on state tax revenue and individual welfare. The policy analysis based on a general equilibrium model suggests that tax revenues would benefit from higher wage-income, sales or property taxes, while any increase in dividend-income tax would result in a reduction of revenues. It is also shown that individuals would suffer from an increase in state-level wage-income tax, dividend-tax or sales tax, while they would benefit from an increase in property taxes. The heterogeneity across states is determined by a TaxIndex, a weighted average of initial taxes at the state level.

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File URL: http://economics.fiu.edu/research/working-papers/2015/1507/1507.pdf
File Function: First version, 2015
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Florida International University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1507.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2015
Handle: RePEc:fiu:wpaper:1507
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Miami, FL 33199

Phone: (305) 348-2316
Fax: (305) 348-1524
Web page: http://economics.fiu.edu

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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Judd, Kenneth L., 1985. "Redistributive taxation in a simple perfect foresight model," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 59-83, October.
  2. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2010. "Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1311-1328.
  3. McKitrick, Ross R., 1998. "The econometric critique of computable general equilibrium modeling: the role of functional forms," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 543-573, October.
  4. Klaus Conrad & Stefan Heng, 2002. "Financing road infrastructure by savings in congestion costs: A CGE analysis," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1), pages 107-122.
  5. Douglas R. Dalenberg & Mark D. Partridge, 1997. "Public Infrastructure and Wages: Public Capital's Role as a Productive Input and Household Amenity," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 73(2), pages 268-284.
  6. Partridge, Mark D. & Rickman, Dan S., 1999. "Which comes first, jobs or people? An analysis of the recent stylized facts," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 117-123, July.
  7. Roos, Michael W. M., 2004. "Agglomeration and the public sector," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 411-427, July.
  8. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 1998. "Regional Computable General Equilibrium Modeling: A Survey and Critical Appraisal," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 21(3), pages 205-248, December.
  9. Douglas R. Dalenberg & Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman, 1998. "Public Infrastructure: Pork or Jobs Creator?," Public Finance Review, , vol. 26(1), pages 24-52, January.
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