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The added value from adopting a CGE approach to analyse changes in environmental trade balances

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  • Turner, Karen
  • Gilmartin, Michelle
  • McGregor, Peter G.
  • Swales, J. Kim

Abstract

The application of multi-region environmental input-output (IO) analysis to the problem of accounting for emissions generation (and/or resource use) under different accounting principles has become increasingly common in the ecological and environmental economics literature in particular, with applications at the international and interregional subnational level. However, while environmental IO analysis is invaluable in accounting for pollution flows in the single time period that the accounts relate to, it is limited when the focus is on modelling the impacts of any marginal change in activity. This is because a conventional demand-driven IO model assumes an entirely passive supply-side in the economy (i.e. all supply is infinitely elastic) and is further restricted by the assumption of universal Leontief (fixed proportions) technology implied by the use of the A and multiplier matrices. Where analysis of marginal changes in activity is required, extension from an IO accounting framework to a more flexible interregional computable general equilibrium (CGE) approach, where behavioural relationships can be modelled in a more realistic and theory-consistent manner, is appropriate. Our argument is illustrated by comparing the results of introducing a positive demand stimulus in the UK economy using IO and CGE interregional models of Scotland and the rest of the UK. In the case of the latter, we demonstrate how more theory consistent modelling of both demand and supply side behaviour at the regional and national levels effect model results, including the impact on the interregional CO2 ‘trade balance’.

Suggested Citation

  • Turner, Karen & Gilmartin, Michelle & McGregor, Peter G. & Swales, J. Kim, 2009. "The added value from adopting a CGE approach to analyse changes in environmental trade balances," SIRE Discussion Papers 2009-13, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
  • Handle: RePEc:edn:sirdps:120
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Louis Beuuséjour & Gordon Lenjosek & Michael Smart, 1995. "A CGE Approach to Modelling Carbon Dioxide Emissions Control in Canada and the United States," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(3), pages 457-488, May.
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    5. Gilmartin, Michelle & Swales, Kim J. & Turner, Karen, 2008. "A comparison of results from MRIO and interregional computable general equilibrium (CGE) analyses of the impacts of a positive demand shock on the ‘CO2 trade balance’ between Scotland and the rest," SIRE Discussion Papers 2008-24, Scottish Institute for Research in Economics (SIRE).
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    Cited by:

    1. Dalin, Carole & Qiu, Huanguang & Hanasaki, Naota & Mauzerall, Denise L. & Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio, 2014. "Balancing water resources conservation and food security in China," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62725, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Nick Hanley & Karen Turner, 2009. "How do improvements in labour productivity in the Scottish economy affect the UK position on the Environmental Kuznets Curve?," Working Papers 0915, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    3. Kemp-Benedict, Eric, 2014. "The inverted pyramid: A neo-Ricardian view on the economy–environment relationship," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 230-241.
    4. Kowalewski, Julia, 2009. "Methodology of the input-output analysis," HWWI Research Papers 1-25, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    CGE modelling; MRIO; CO2 trade balance; environmental responsibility;

    JEL classification:

    • D57 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Input-Output Tables and Analysis
    • D58 - Microeconomics - - General Equilibrium and Disequilibrium - - - Computable and Other Applied General Equilibrium Models
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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