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The welfare effects of a liquidity-saving mechanism

Author

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  • Enghin Atalay
  • Antoine Martin
  • James J. McAndrews

Abstract

This paper considers the welfare effect of introducing a liquidity-saving mechanism (LSM) in a real-time gross settlement (RTGS) payment system. We study the planner's problem to get a better understanding of the economic role of an LSM and find that an LSM can achieve the planner's allocation for some parameter values. The planner's allocation cannot happen without an LSM, as long as some payments can be delayed without cost. We show that, in equilibrium with an LSM, there can be either too few or too many payments settled early compared with the planner's allocation, depending on the parameter values. Using Fedwire data to calibrate our model, we describe the equilibrium that would arise with an LSM and compare welfare with and without an LSM. Our results suggest that introducing an LSM could have significant benefits.

Suggested Citation

  • Enghin Atalay & Antoine Martin & James J. McAndrews, 2008. "The welfare effects of a liquidity-saving mechanism," Staff Reports 331, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:331
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin, Antoine & McAndrews, James, 2008. "Liquidity-saving mechanisms," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, pages 554-567.
    2. Angelini, Paolo, 2000. "Are Banks Risk Averse? Intraday Timing of Operations in the Interbank Market," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 32(1), pages 54-73, February.
    3. Angelini, Paolo, 1998. "An analysis of competitive externalities in gross settlement systems," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 1-18, January.
    4. Kahn, Charles M. & Roberds, William, 2001. "The CLS bank: a solution to the risks of international payments settlement?," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, pages 191-226.
    5. Morten L. Bech & Bart Hobijn, 2007. "Technology Diffusion within Central Banking: The Case of Real-Time Gross Settlement," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 3(3), pages 147-181, September.
    6. Bech, Morten L. & Garratt, Rod, 2003. "The intraday liquidity management game," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 198-219, April.
    7. Mills Jr., David C. & Nesmith, Travis D., 2008. "Risk and concentration in payment and securities settlement systems," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 542-553, April.
    8. Kurt Johnson & James J. McAndrews & Kimmo Soramaki, 2004. "Economizing on liquidity with deferred settlement mechanisms," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Dec, pages 51-72.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Martin, Antoine & McAndrews, James, 2010. "A study of competing designs for a liquidity-saving mechanism," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(8), pages 1818-1826, August.
    2. Marius Jurgilas & Antoine Martin, 2013. "Liquidity-saving mechanisms in collateral-based RTGS payment systems," Annals of Finance, Springer, pages 29-60.
    3. Lana Embree & Varya Taylor, 2015. "Examining Full Collateral Coverage in Canada’s Large Value Transfer System," Staff Working Papers 15-29, Bank of Canada.
    4. Lester Benjamin, 2009. "Settlement Systems," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-35, May.
    5. Norman, Ben, 2010. "Financial Stability Paper No 7: Liquidity Saving in Real-Time Gross Settlement Systems - an Overview," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 7, Bank of England.
    6. Koeppl, Thorsten & Monnet, Cyril & Temzelides, Ted, 2012. "Optimal clearing arrangements for financial trades," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(1), pages 189-203.
    7. Monticini, Andrea & Ravazzolo, Francesco, 2014. "Forecasting the intraday market price of money," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, pages 304-315.
    8. De Caux, Robert & Brede, Markus & McGroarty, Frank, 2016. "Payment prioritisation and liquidity risk in collateralised interbank payment systems," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 139-150.
    9. Ball, Alan & Denbee, Edward & Manning, Mark & Wetherilt, Anne, 2011. "Financial Stability Paper No 11: Intraday Liquidity - Risk and Regulation," Bank of England Financial Stability Papers 11, Bank of England.
    10. Biliana Alexandrova-Kabadjova & Francisco Solís-Robleda, 2013. "Managing Intraday Liquidity: The Mexican Experience," Working Papers 2013-01, Banco de México.
    11. Tomohiro Ota, 2016. "Sequential payments and optimal pricing in payment systems," Annals of Finance, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 441-463, December.
    12. Carlos A. Arango & Freddy H. Cepeda, 2016. "Non-monotonic Tradeoffs of Tiering in a Large Value Payment System," Borradores de Economia 946, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.

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    Keywords

    Payment systems ; Bank liquidity ; Fedwire ; Banks and banking; Central;

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