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Capital flows and Japanese asset volatility

  • Christopher J. Neely
  • Brett W. Fawley

Characterizing asset price volatility is an important goal for financial economists. The literature has shown that variables that proxy for the information arrival process can help explain and/or forecast volatility. Unfortunately, however, obtaining good measures of volume and/or order flow is expensive or difficult in decentralized markets such as foreign exchange. We investigate the extent that Japanese capital flows—which are released weekly—reflect information arrival that improves foreign exchange and equity volatility forecasts. We find that capital flows can help explain transitory shocks to GARCH volatility. Transactions by Japanese residents in foreign bond markets have the most explanatory power among capital flows and that power is much greater in the second subsample.

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Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in its series Working Papers with number 2011-034.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2011-034
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  1. West, Kenneth D. & Cho, Dongchul, 1995. "The predictive ability of several models of exchange rate volatility," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 367-391, October.
  2. Frömmel, Michael & Mende, Alexander & Menkhoff, Lukas, 2008. "Order flows, news, and exchange rate volatility," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 994-1012, October.
  3. BAUWENS, Luc & BEN OMRANE, Walid & GIOT, Pierre, . "News announcements, market activity and volatility in the euro/dollar foreign exchange market," CORE Discussion Papers RP -1787, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  4. David Berger & Alain Chaboud & Erik Hjalmarsson & Edward Howorka, 2006. "What drives volatility persistence in the foreign exchange market?," International Finance Discussion Papers 862, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. Bollerslev, Tim, 1986. "Generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 307-327, April.
  6. Christopher J. Neely, 1998. "Target zones and conditional volatility: the role of realignments," Working Papers 1994-008, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  7. Savaser, Tanseli, 2011. "Exchange rate response to macronews: Through the lens of microstructure," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 107-126, February.
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