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Customer Liquidity Provision : Implications for Corporate Bond Transaction Costs

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Abstract

The convention in calculating trading costs in corporate bond markets is to assume that dealers provide liquidity to non-dealers (customers) and calculate average bid-ask spreads that customers pay dealers. We show that customers often provide liquidity in corporate bond markets, and thus, average bid-ask spreads underestimate trading costs that customers demanding liquidity pay. Compared with periods before the 2008 financial crisis, substantial amounts of liquidity provision have moved from the dealer sector to the non-dealer sector, consistent with decreased dealer risk capacity. Among trades where customers are demanding liquidity, we find that these trades pay 35 to 50 percent higher spreads than before the crisis. Our results indicate that liquidity decreased in corporate bond markets and can help explain why despite the decrease in dealers' risk capacity, average bid-ask spread estimates remain low.

Suggested Citation

  • Jaewon Choi & Yesol Huh, 2017. "Customer Liquidity Provision : Implications for Corporate Bond Transaction Costs," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2017-116, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedgfe:2017-116
    DOI: 10.17016/FEDS.2017.116
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mike Anderson & René M. Stulz, 2017. "Is Post-Crisis Bond Liquidity Lower?," NBER Working Papers 23317, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Erik Vogt & Michael Fleming & Or Shachar & Tobias Adrian, 2017. "Market Liquidity After the Financial Crisis," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 43-83, November.
    3. Semih Üslü, 2019. "Pricing and Liquidity in Decentralized Asset Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 87(6), pages 2079-2140, November.
    4. Cimon, David & Garriott, Corey, 2019. "Banking regulation and market making," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 109(C).
    5. Adrian, Tobias & Boyarchenko, Nina & Shachar, Or, 2017. "Dealer balance sheets and bond liquidity provision," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 92-109.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. The Costs of Inefficient Regulation: The Volcker Rule
      by Kim Schoenholtz in Money, Banking and Financial Markets on 2019-09-23 12:54:49

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    Cited by:

    1. Bicu-Lieb, Andreea & Chen, Louisa & Elliott, David, 2020. "The leverage ratio and liquidity in the gilt and gilt repo markets," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 48(C).
    2. Goldstein, Michael A. & Hotchkiss, Edith S., 2020. "Providing liquidity in an illiquid market: Dealer behavior in US corporate bonds," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 135(1), pages 16-40.
    3. Nathan Foley-Fisher & Stefan Gissler & Stephane Verani, 2019. "Over-the-Counter Market Liquidity and Securities Lending," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 33, pages 272-294, July.
    4. Corey Garriott & Jesse Johal, 2018. "Customer Liquidity Provision in Canadian Bond Markets," Staff Analytical Notes 2018-12, Bank of Canada.
    5. Huh, Yesol & Infante, Sebastian, 2021. "Bond market intermediation and the Role of Repo," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    6. Mallaburn, David & Roberts-Sklar, Matt & Silvestri, Laura, 2019. "Resilience of trading networks: evidence from the sterling corporate bond market," Bank of England working papers 813, Bank of England.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank regulation; Liquidity; Corporate bond; Financial intermediation; Volcker rule;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G10 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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