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An international perspective on oil price shocks and U.S. economic activity

Author

Listed:
  • Nathan S. Balke
  • Stephen P. A. Brown
  • Mine K. Yücel

Abstract

The effect of oil price shocks on U.S. economic activity seems to have changed since the mid-1990s. A variety of explanations have been offered for the seeming change—including better luck, the reduced energy intensity of the U.S. economy, a more flexible economy, more experience with oil price shocks and better monetary policy. These explanations point to a weakening of the relationship between oil prices shocks and economic activity rather than the fundamentally different response that may be evident since the mid-1990s.> ; Using a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model of world economic activity, we employ Bayesian methods to assess how economic activity responds to oil price shocks arising from supply shocks and demand shocks originating in the United States or elsewhere in the world. We find that both oil supply and oil demand shocks have contributed significantly to oil price fluctuations and that U.S. output fluctuations are derived largely from domestic shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Nathan S. Balke & Stephen P. A. Brown & Mine K. Yücel, 2008. "An international perspective on oil price shocks and U.S. economic activity," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 20, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:feddgw:20
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    File URL: http://dallasfed.org/assets/documents/institute/wpapers/2008/0020.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Timilsina, Govinda R., 2015. "Oil prices and the global economy: A general equilibrium analysis," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 669-675.
    2. Brown, Stephen P.A. & Huntington, Hillard G., 2013. "Assessing the U.S. oil security premium," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 118-127.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Petroleum industry and trade ; Petroleum products - Prices ; International trade ; Economic conditions - United States;

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