IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Analysis of Food Consumption Behavior by Japanese Households

  • Wen S. Chern
  • Kimiko Ishibashi
  • Kiyoshi Taniguchi

    (Agricultural and Development Economics Division, Food and Agriculture Organization)

  • Yuki Tokoyama

The objective of this research is to analyze the food consumption patterns and to conduct econometric analysis of food demand structure in Japan. In this study, we pay special attention to the questions on whether or not rice is an inferior good as previous researchers have so claimed and to what extent Japanese food consumption pattern has been westernized. We use the cross-sectional household data, Annual Report on the Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES) in 1997 compiled by the Statistics Bureau, Management and Coordination Agency in Japan. For major 11 food items, the total number of observations used for estimation is 95,223. Food items are non-glutinous rice, bread, noodle, fresh fish, and shellfish, fresh meat, milk, eggs, fresh vegetables, fresh fruits, fats and oil, and food away from home. For meat items, the total number of observations used for estimation is 94,200, and items in interest are beef, pork, poultry, ground meat, ham, sausage, and bacon. In order to deal with the zero-consumption problem associated with household-level microdata, we apply various single equation models: Working-Leser model estimated by OLS, Heckman’s sample selection model, and Tobit mode. For a complete demand system analysis, we apply the linearly approximated almost ideal demand system (LA/AIDS).Additionally, we apply the nonlinear almost ideal demand (AIDS) system. Empirical results from the major 11 food items show that the expenditure elasticity of rice is positive and close to one. This proves that rice consumed in Japan is a normal good, contrary to the results from preceding studies. Marshallian uncompensated and Hicksian compensated own-price elasticities for rice are highly elastic in all models; on the other hand, the own price elasticity for meat is relatively price inelastic. Fresh meats and rice are mild complements in all models; however, fresh fish and rice show the mixed results with repect to their substitution pattern. Results from meat items show that the expenditure elasticity of beef is greater than unity, while other meat products are inelastic. Additionally, the expenditure and price elasticities look very similar to that of Western nations. This study shows that the Japanese meat consumption pattern has become westernized.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: ftp://ftp.fao.org/docrep/fao/007/ae025e/ae025e00.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Paper provided by Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA) in its series Working Papers with number 02-06.

as
in new window

Length: 81 pages
Date of creation: 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0206
Contact details of provider: Postal: Agricultural Sector in Economic Development Service FAO Viale delle Terme di Caracalla 00153 Rome Italy
Phone: +39(6) 57051
Fax: +39 06 57055522
Web page: http://www.fao.org/es/esa/
Email:


More information through EDIRC

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Eales, James S. & Roheim, Cathy A., 1999. "Testing Separability Of Japanese Demand For Meat And Fish Within Differential Demand Systems," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 24(01), July.
  2. Price, David W. & Gislason, Conrad, 2001. "Identification of habit in Japanese food consumption," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 289-295, March.
  3. Moschini, Giancarlo, 1998. "The semiflexible almost ideal demand system," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 349-364, February.
  4. P. Y. Chen & M. M. Veeman, 1991. "An Almost Ideal Demand System Analysis for Meats with Habit Formation and Structural Change," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 39(2), pages 223-235, 07.
  5. Price, David W. & Gislason, Conrad, 2001. "Identification of habit in Japanese food consumption," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 24(3), March.
  6. Heckman, James J, 1978. "Dummy Endogenous Variables in a Simultaneous Equation System," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(4), pages 931-59, July.
  7. Lee, Lung-Fei & Pitt, Mark M, 1986. "Microeconometric Demand Systems with Binding Nonnegativity Constraints: The Dual Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(5), pages 1237-42, September.
  8. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-26, June.
  9. Patrick J. Byrne & Oral Capps & Atanu Saha, 1996. "Analysis of Food-Away-from-Home Expenditure Patterns for U.S. Households, 1982–89," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 614-627.
  10. Capps, Oral, Jr. & Tsai, Reyfong & Kirby, Raymond & Williams, Gary W., 1994. "A Comparison Of Demands For Meat Products In The Pacific Rim Region," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 19(01), July.
  11. Heien, Dale & Wessells, Cathy Roheim, 1990. "Demand Systems Estimation with Microdata: A Censored Regression Approach," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 8(3), pages 365-71, July.
  12. Hayes, Dermot J. & Wahl, Thomas I. & Williams, Gary W., 1990. "Testing Restrictions on a Model of Japanese Meat Demand," Staff General Research Papers 10940, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  13. Bouis, Howarth E., 1994. "The effect of income on demand for food in poor countries: Are our food consumption databases giving us reliable estimates?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 199-226, June.
  14. Persaud, Suresh Chand & Chern, Wen S., 2002. "Meat Trade Liberalization And Soybean-Rapeseed Competition In The Japanese Market," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 20(1).
  15. Frank Asche & Cathy R. Wessells, 1997. "On Price Indices in the Almost Ideal Demand System," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(4), pages 1182-1185.
  16. Pollak, Robert A & Wales, Terence J, 1978. "Estimation of Complete Demand Systems from Household Budget Data: The Linear and Quadratic Expenditure Systems," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 68(3), pages 348-59, June.
  17. Moschini, GianCarlo & Meilke, Karl D., 1989. "Modeling the Pattern of Structural Change in U.S. Meat Demand," Staff General Research Papers 11266, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  18. Moschini, GianCarlo, 1998. "Semiflexible Almost Ideal Demand System, The," Staff General Research Papers 1193, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
  19. Alston, Julian M & Foster, Kenneth A & Green, Richard D, 1994. "Estimating Elasticities with the Linear Approximate Almost Ideal Demand System: Some Monte Carlo Results," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(2), pages 351-56, May.
  20. Pollak, Robert A & Wales, Terence J, 1981. "Demographic Variables in Demand Analysis," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 49(6), pages 1533-51, November.
  21. Hiroshi Fujiki, 2000. "Japanese Rice Market Liberalization: A Competitive Equilibrium Approach," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 51(4), pages 492-518, December.
  22. Atanu Saha & Oral Capps & Patrick Byrne, 1997. "Calculating marginal effects in dichotomous - continuous models," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 181-185.
  23. Wen S. Chern & Colin A. Carter & Shun-Yi Shei (ed.), 2000. "Food Security in Asia," Books, Edward Elgar, number 2150.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fao:wpaper:0206. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gustavo Anríquez)

The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Gustavo Anríquez to update the entry or send us the correct address

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.