IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/fam/rpseri/rp49.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Playing Hardball: Relationship Banking in the Age of Credit Derivatives

Author

Listed:
  • Stefan ARPING,

    (University of Lausanne)

Abstract

This paper develops a contracting framework in order to explore the effects of credit derivatives on banks’ incentives to monitor loans, their incentives to intervene, and, ultimately, borrowers’ incentives to perform. We show that (i) credit derivatives with short term maturity strengthen incentives to intervene, incentives to monitor, and managerial incentives to perform; (ii) while credit derivatives with long term maturity weaken incentives to intervene, intervention incentives can be maintained by sourcing more short term credit insurance; (iii) long term credit insurance nevertheless weakens managerial incentives through a dilution effect. These findings suggest that properly designed credit derivatives strengthen monitoring incentives and result in efficiency gains, rather than impeding economic efficiency.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan ARPING,, 2002. "Playing Hardball: Relationship Banking in the Age of Credit Derivatives," FAME Research Paper Series rp49, International Center for Financial Asset Management and Engineering.
  • Handle: RePEc:fam:rpseri:rp49
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.swissfinanceinstitute.ch/rp49.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlstrom, Charles T. & Samolyk, Katherine A., 1995. "Loan sales as a response to market-based capital constraints," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(3-4), pages 627-646, June.
    2. Choe, Chongwoo, 1998. "Contract design and costly verification games," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 327-340, February.
    3. Bengt Holmstrom & Jean Tirole, 1997. "Financial Intermediation, Loanable Funds, and The Real Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(3), pages 663-691.
    4. Fahad Khalil, 1997. "Auditing Without Commitment," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 28(4), pages 629-640, Winter.
    5. John Kiff & Jennifer A. Elliott & Elias G. Kazarian & Jodi G. Scarlata & Carolyne Spackman, 2009. "Credit Derivatives; Systemic Risks and Policy Options?," IMF Working Papers 09/254, International Monetary Fund.
    6. Besanko, David & Kanatas, George, 1993. "Credit Market Equilibrium with Bank Monitoring and Moral Hazard," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 6(1), pages 213-232.
    7. Duffee, Gregory R. & Zhou, Chunsheng, 2001. "Credit derivatives in banking: Useful tools for managing risk?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 25-54, August.
    8. Titman, Sheridan, 1984. "The effect of capital structure on a firm's liquidation decision," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 137-151, March.
    9. Froot, Kenneth A. & Stein, Jeremy C., 1998. "Risk management, capital budgeting, and capital structure policy for financial institutions: an integrated approach," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 55-82, January.
    10. Rajan, Raghuram & Winton, Andrew, 1995. " Covenants and Collateral as Incentives to Monitor," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1113-1146, September.
    11. Rajan, Raghuram G, 1992. " Insiders and Outsiders: The Choice between Informed and Arm's-Length Debt," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(4), pages 1367-1400, September.
    12. Manove, Michael & Padilla, A Jorge & Pagano, Marco, 2001. "Collateral versus Project Screening: A Model of Lazy Banks," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 32(4), pages 726-744, Winter.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Parlour, Christine A. & Winton, Andrew, 2013. "Laying off credit risk: Loan sales versus credit default swaps," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 107(1), pages 25-45.

    More about this item

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fam:rpseri:rp49. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marilyn Barja). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fameech.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.