IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/eth/wpswif/09-117.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Finance for Renewable Energy: An Empirical Analysis of Developing and Transition Economies

Author

Abstract

This paper examines the role of the financial sector in renewable energy (RE) development. Although RE can bring socio-economic and environ- mental benefits, its implementation faces a number of obstacles, especially in non-OECD countries. One of these obstacles is financing: underdevel- oped financial sectors are unable to efficiently channel loans to RE produc- ers. The influence of financial sector development on the use of renewable energy resources is confirmed in panel data estimations on up to 119 non- OECD countries for 1980-2006. Financial intermediation, in particular commercial banking, has a significant positive effect on the amount of RE produced, and the impact is especially large when we consider non- hydropower RE such as wind, solar, geothermal, and biomass. There is also evidence that the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol has had a significant positive impact on the development of the RE sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Christa N. Brunnschweiler, 2009. "Finance for Renewable Energy: An Empirical Analysis of Developing and Transition Economies," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 09/117, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:eth:wpswif:09-117
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.ethz.ch/content/dam/ethz/special-interest/mtec/cer-eth/cer-eth-dam/documents/working-papers/WP-09-117.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlin, Wendy & Mayer, Colin, 2003. "Finance, investment, and growth," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 191-226, July.
    2. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    3. Tadesse, Solomon, 2002. "Financial Architecture and Economic Performance: International Evidence," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 429-454, October.
    4. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.), Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084 Central Bank of Chile.
    5. Dennis Tirpak & Helen Adams, 2008. "Bilateral and multilateral financial assistance for the energy sector of developing countries," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 135-151, March.
    6. Williams, J.H. & Ghanadan, R., 2006. "Electricity reform in developing and transition countries: A reappraisal," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 815-844.
    7. Tharakan, Pradeep J. & de Castro, Julio & Kroeger, Timm, 2007. "Energy sector assistance in developing countries: Current trends and policy recommendations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 734-738, January.
    8. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 1999. "Institutions, financial markets, and firm debt maturity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 295-336, December.
    9. Christa N. Brunnschweiler, 2006. "Financing the alternative: renewable energy in developing and transition countries," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 06/49, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
    10. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    renewable energy; financial sector; banking; development;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eth:wpswif:09-117. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iwethch.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.