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Finance for renewable energy: an empirical analysis of developing and transition economies


This paper examines the role of the financial sector in renewable energy (RE) development. Although RE can bring socio-economic and environmental benefits, its implementation faces a number of obstacles, especially in non-OECD countries. One of these obstacles is financing: underdeveloped financial sectors are unable to efficiently channel loans to RE producers. The influence of financial sector development on the use of renewable energy resources is confirmed in panel data estimations on up to 119 non-OECD countries for 1980–2006. Financial intermediation, in particular commercial banking, has a significant positive effect on the amount of RE produced, and the impact is especially large when we consider non-hydropower RE such as wind, solar, geothermal and biomass. There is also evidence that the development of the RE sector has picked up significantly in the period since the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol.

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Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal Environment and Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 15 (2010)
Issue (Month): 03 (June)
Pages: 241-274

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Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:15:y:2010:i:03:p:241-274_00
Contact details of provider: Postal: Cambridge University Press, UPH, Shaftesbury Road, Cambridge CB2 8BS UK
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  1. Tadesse, Solomon, 2002. "Financial Architecture and Economic Performance: International Evidence," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 429-454, October.
  2. Williams, J.H. & Ghanadan, R., 2006. "Electricity reform in developing and transition countries: A reappraisal," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 815-844.
  3. Carlin, Wendy & Mayer, Colin, 2003. "Finance, investment, and growth," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 191-226, July.
  4. King, Robert G. & Levine, Ross, 1993. "Finance and growth : Schumpeter might be right," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1083, The World Bank.
  5. repec:bla:restud:v:58:y:1991:i:2:p:277-97 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.), Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084 Central Bank of Chile.
  7. Dennis Tirpak & Helen Adams, 2008. "Bilateral and multilateral financial assistance for the energy sector of developing countries," Climate Policy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 135-151, March.
  8. Demirguc-Kunt, Asli & Maksimovic, Vojislav, 1999. "Institutions, financial markets, and firm debt maturity," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 295-336, December.
  9. Tharakan, Pradeep J. & de Castro, Julio & Kroeger, Timm, 2007. "Energy sector assistance in developing countries: Current trends and policy recommendations," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 734-738, January.
  10. King, Robert G. & Levine, Ross, 1993. "Finance and growth : Schumpeter might be right," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1083, The World Bank.
  11. Christa N. Brunnschweiler, 2006. "Financing the alternative: renewable energy in developing and transition countries," CER-ETH Economics working paper series 06/49, CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research (CER-ETH) at ETH Zurich.
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