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Finance for renewable energy: an empirical analysis of developing and transition economies

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  • BRUNNSCHWEILER, CHRISTA N.

Abstract

This paper examines the role of the financial sector in renewable energy (RE) development. Although RE can bring socio-economic and environmental benefits, its implementation faces a number of obstacles, especially in non-OECD countries. One of these obstacles is financing: underdeveloped financial sectors are unable to efficiently channel loans to RE producers. The influence of financial sector development on the use of renewable energy resources is confirmed in panel data estimations on up to 119 non-OECD countries for 1980–2006. Financial intermediation, in particular commercial banking, has a significant positive effect on the amount of RE produced, and the impact is especially large when we consider non-hydropower RE such as wind, solar, geothermal and biomass. There is also evidence that the development of the RE sector has picked up significantly in the period since the adoption of the Kyoto Protocol.

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  • Brunnschweiler, Christa N., 2010. "Finance for renewable energy: an empirical analysis of developing and transition economies," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(03), pages 241-274, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:endeec:v:15:y:2010:i:03:p:241-274_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Kahia, Montassar & Ben Aissa, Mohamed Safouane & kadria, Mohamed, 2014. "Do renewable energy policies promote economic growth? A nonparametric approach," MPRA Paper 80751, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kempa, Karol & Moslener, Ulf, 2015. "Climate policy with the chequebook: Economic considerations on climate investment support," Frankfurt School - Working Paper Series 219, Frankfurt School of Finance and Management.
    3. repec:eee:renene:v:113:y:2017:i:c:p:52-63 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Scholtens, Bert & Veldhuis, Rineke, 2015. "How does the development of the financial industry advance renewable energy? A panel regression study of 198 countries over three decades," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113114, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    5. Dutz, Mark A. & Sharma, Siddharth, 2012. "Green growth, technology and innovation," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5932, The World Bank.
    6. Ohunakin, Olayinka S. & Adaramola, Muyiwa S. & Oyewola, Olanrewaju. M. & Fagbenle, Richard O., 2014. "Solar energy applications and development in Nigeria: Drivers and barriers," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 294-301.
    7. Dulal, Hari Bansha & Shah, Kalim U. & Sapkota, Chandan & Uma, Gengaiah & Kandel, Bibek R., 2013. "Renewable energy diffusion in Asia: Can it happen without government support?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 301-311.
    8. Julien Jacqmin, 2018. "The role of market-oriented institutions in the deployment of renewable energies: evidences from Europe," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(2), pages 202-215, January.
    9. Gabriel, Cle-Anne, 2016. "What is challenging renewable energy entrepreneurs in developing countries?," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 362-371.
    10. repec:kap:enreec:v:68:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10640-016-0025-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Shaikh, Salman, 2014. "Tax Increment Financing in Pakistan," MPRA Paper 53801, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Ng, Thiam Hee & Tao, Jacqueline Yujia, 2016. "Bond financing for renewable energy in Asia," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 509-517.
    13. Gottschamer, L. & Zhang, Q., 2016. "Interactions of factors impacting implementation and sustainability of renewable energy sourced electricity," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 164-174.
    14. repec:eco:journ2:2017-02-26 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Zhao, Zhen-Yu & Zuo, Jian & Zillante, George, 2013. "Factors influencing the success of BOT power plant projects in China: A review," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 446-453.
    16. Best, Rohan, 2017. "Switching towards coal or renewable energy? The effects of financial capital on energy transitions," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 75-83.
    17. David Popp, 2012. "The Role of Technological Change in Green Growth," NBER Working Papers 18506, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Zhao, Yong & Tang, Kam Ki & Wang, Li-li, 2013. "Do renewable electricity policies promote renewable electricity generation? Evidence from panel data," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 887-897.
    19. Lin, Boqiang & Omoju, Oluwasola E. & Okonkwo, Jennifer U., 2016. "Factors influencing renewable electricity consumption in China," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 687-696.
    20. Popp, David, 2012. "The role of technological change in green growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6239, The World Bank.
    21. Pfeiffer, Birte & Mulder, Peter, 2013. "Explaining the diffusion of renewable energy technology in developing countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 285-296.
    22. Miguel Cárdenas Rodríguez & Ivan Haščič & Nick Johnstone & Jérôme Silva & Antoine Ferey, 2015. "Renewable Energy Policies and Private Sector Investment: Evidence from Financial Microdata," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 62(1), pages 163-188, September.
    23. repec:brc:brccej:v:2:y:2017:i:1:p:5-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Shaikh, Salman, 2013. "Global Competitiveness: Challenges & Solutions for Pakistan," MPRA Paper 53796, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. Kim, Jeayoon & Park, Kwangwoo, 2016. "Financial development and deployment of renewable energy technologies," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 238-250.

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    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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