IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ess/wpaper/id4382.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Foreign Direct Investment and Technology Spillover: An Evaluation Across Different Clusters in India

Author

Listed:
  • Pami Dua

    ()

  • B N Goldar

    ()

  • Smruti Ranjan Behera

    ()

Abstract

The paper attempts to explore the technology spillover effects of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) in Indian manufacturing industries across different selected clusters in India. To measure the spillover effect to domestic firms in a particular cluster, a model is used that combines an innovative production function with a conventional production function. The model parameter estimates provide an evaluation of the technology spillovers in a cluster and the inter-cluster spillovers taking place in various regions. [Working Paper No. 200]. URL:[http://www.cdedse.org/].

Suggested Citation

  • Pami Dua & B N Goldar & Smruti Ranjan Behera, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment and Technology Spillover: An Evaluation Across Different Clusters in India," Working Papers id:4382, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4382
    Note: Institutional Papers
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.esocialsciences.org/Download/repecDownload.aspx?fname=A2011812154253_20.pdf&fcategory=Articles&AId=4382&fref=repec
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jonathan E. Haskel & Sonia C. Pereira & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2007. "Does Inward Foreign Direct Investment Boost the Productivity of Domestic Firms?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(3), pages 482-496, August.
    2. Kokko, Ari, 1994. "Technology, market characteristics, and spillovers," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 279-293, April.
    3. Lisa De Propris & Nigel Driffield, 2006. "The importance of clusters for spillovers from foreign direct investment and technology sourcing," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 30(2), pages 277-291, March.
    4. Kohpaiboon, Archanun, 2006. "Foreign direct investment and technology spillover: A cross-industry analysis of Thai manufacturing," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 541-556, March.
    5. Kamal Saggi, 2002. "Trade, Foreign Direct Investment, and International Technology Transfer: A Survey," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 191-235, September.
    6. Rodrik, Dani, 1999. "Where Did All the Growth Go? External Shocks, Social Conflict, and Growth Collapses," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 385-412, December.
    7. Aitken, Brian & Harrison, Ann & DEC, 1994. "Do domestic firms benefit from foreign direct investment? Evidence from panel data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1248, The World Bank.
    8. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    9. Wolfgang Keller, 2002. "Geographic Localization of International Technology Diffusion," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 120-142, March.
    10. László Halpern & Balázs Muraközy, 2007. "Does distance matter in spillover?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 781-805, October.
    11. Sourafel Girma, 2005. "Absorptive Capacity and Productivity Spillovers from FDI: A Threshold Regression Analysis," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 67(3), pages 281-306, June.
    12. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Issues in Assessing the Contribution of Research and Development to Productivity Growth," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 17-45 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Thompson, Edmund R., 2002. "Clustering of Foreign Direct Investment and Enhanced Technology Transfer: Evidence from Hong Kong Garment Firms in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 873-889, May.
    14. Matthew J. Slaughter, 2002. "Does Inward Foreign Direct Investment Contribute to Skill Upgrading in Developing Countries?," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-08, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
    15. Pack, Howard & Saggi, Kamal, 2001. "Vertical technology transfer via international outsourcing," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 65(2), pages 389-415, August.
    16. Lall, Sanjaya, 1980. "The international automotive industry and the developing world," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 8(10), pages 789-812, October.
    17. Blalock, Garrick & Gertler, Paul J., 2008. "Welfare gains from Foreign Direct Investment through technology transfer to local suppliers," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 402-421, March.
    18. Rodrik, Dani & van Ypersele, Tanguy, 2001. "Captial mobility, distributive conflict and international tax coordination," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 57-73, June.
    19. Brun, J. F. & Combes, J. L. & Renard, M. F., 2002. "Are there spillover effects between coastal and noncoastal regions in China?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 13(2-3), pages 161-169.
    20. Xu, Bin, 2000. "Multinational enterprises, technology diffusion, and host country productivity growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 477-493, August.
    21. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
    22. repec:spr:stmapp:v:13:y:2004:i:3:d:10.1007_s10260-004-0088-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Richard Blundell & Stephen Bond, 2000. "GMM Estimation with persistent panel data: an application to production functions," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 321-340.
    24. Elhanan Helpman & David T. Coe, 1993. "International RandD Spillovers," IMF Working Papers 93/84, International Monetary Fund.
    25. Ahn, Seung C. & Schmidt, Peter, 1995. "Efficient estimation of models for dynamic panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 5-27, July.
    26. Ernesto M. Pernia & J.M. Ian S. Salas, 2005. "Investment Climate and Regional Development in the Philippines," UP School of Economics Discussion Papers 200501, University of the Philippines School of Economics.
    27. Javorcik, Beata S. & Saggi, Kamal & Spatareanu, Mariana, 2004. "Does it matter where you come from? vertical spillovers from foreign direct investment and the nationality of investors," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3449, The World Bank.
    28. Haddad, Mona & Harrison, Ann, 1993. "Are there positive spillovers from direct foreign investment? : Evidence from panel data for Morocco," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 51-74, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    FDI; foreign direct investment; Indian; manufacturing industries; India; domestic firms; production function; technology spillovers; regions; developing economies; productivity; Pareto-improving distribution; competition; Economic geography; Resources; capital; technology; inputs; Competitive Advantage;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • L6 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Manufacturing
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4382. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Padma Prakash). General contact details of provider: http://www.esocialsciences.org .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.