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Beer Drinking Nations: The Determinants of Global Beer Consumption

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  • Johan F.M. Swinnen
  • Liesbeth Colen

Abstract

In this paper the evolution of beer consumption is analyzed between countries and over time. Historically, there have been major changes in beer consumption in the world. In recent times, per capita consumption has decreased in traditional “beer drinking nations†while it increased strongly in emerging economies. Recently, China has overtaken the US as the largest beer economy. A quantitative empirical analysis shows that the relationship between income and beer consumption has an inverse U-shape. URL:[http://www.econ.kuleuven.be/licos/DP/DP2010/DP270.pdf].

Suggested Citation

  • Johan F.M. Swinnen & Liesbeth Colen, 2011. "Beer Drinking Nations: The Determinants of Global Beer Consumption," Working Papers id:4324, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:4324
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Akerlof, George A, 1991. "Procrastination and Obedience," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(2), pages 1-19, May.
    2. Joshua Aizenman & Eileen Brooks, 2008. "Globalization and Taste Convergence: the Cases of Wine and Beer," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(2), pages 217-233, May.
    3. Lariviere, Eric & Larue, Bruno & Chalfant, Jim, 2000. "Modeling the demand for alcoholic beverages and advertising specifications," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 22(2), pages 147-162, March.
    4. Robert J. Barro & Rachel M. McCleary, 2005. "Which Countries Have State Religions?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(4), pages 1331-1370.
    5. Ornstein, Stanley I & Hanssens, Dominique M, 1985. " Alcohol Control Laws and the Consumption of Distilled Spirits and Beer," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 12(2), pages 200-213, September.
    6. Lariviere, Eric & Larue, Bruno & Chalfant, Jim, 2000. "Modeling the demand for alcoholic beverages and advertising specifications," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(2), March.
    7. Swinnen, Johan F.M. (ed.), 2011. "The Economics of Beer," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199693801.
    8. James Fogarty, 2010. "The Demand For Beer, Wine And Spirits: A Survey Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 428-478, July.
    9. Victor J. Tremblay & Carol Horton Tremblay, 2005. "The US Brewing Industry: Data and Economic Analysis," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262201518, January.
    10. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics and Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753.
    11. Becker, Gary S & Murphy, Kevin M, 1988. "A Theory of Rational Addiction," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 675-700, August.
    12. Damiaan Persyn & Johan F.M.Swinnen & Stijn Vanormelingen, 2010. "Belgian Beers : Where History meets Globalization," LICOS Discussion Papers 27110, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    13. Stigler, George J & Becker, Gary S, 1977. "De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(2), pages 76-90, March.
    14. Jon Nelson, 2003. "Advertising Bans, Monopoly, and Alcohol Demand: Testing for Substitution Effects using State Panel Data," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 22(1), pages 1-25, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Poelmans, Eline & Swinnen, Johan F.M., 2011. "From Monasteries to Multinationals (and Back): A Historical Review of the Beer Economy," Journal of Wine Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(02), pages 196-216, September.
    2. Koen Deconinck & Jo Swinnen, 2012. "Peer Effects in Alcohol Consumption: Evidence from Russia’s Beer Boom," LICOS Discussion Papers 31612, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    3. Esposti, Roberto & Fastigi, Matteo & Orazi, Francesco & Viganò, Elena, 2015. "The irresistible rise of craft breweries in Italy: magic out of nowhere or just another example of agro-food diversification?," 2015 Fourth Congress, June 11-12, 2015, Ancona, Italy 207271, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
    4. Roberto ESPOSTI & Matteo FASTIGI & Elena VIGANO', 2016. "The Irresistible Rise of the Craft-Brewing Sector in Italy: Can We Explain It?," Working Papers 414, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    5. Deconinck, Koen & Swinnen, Johan, 2015. "Peer effects and the rise of beer in Russia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 83-96.
    6. Koen Deconinck & Johan F.M. Swinnen, 2012. "War, Taxes, and Borders:How Beer Created Belgium," LICOS Discussion Papers 30812, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    beer consumption; history; taste convergence; beer; per capita; beer drinking nations; US; china; quantitative empirical analysis; traditional; income; emerging economies; consumption patterns;

    JEL classification:

    • N30 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • Q11 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis; Prices

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