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The health benefits of a targeted cash transfer: the UK Winter Fuel Payment

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  • Crossley, Thomas F.
  • Zilio, Federico

Abstract

Each year the UK records 25,000 or more excess winter deaths, primarily among the elderly. A key policy response is the “Winter Fuel Payment†(WFP), a labelled but unconditional cash transfer to older households. The WFP has been shown to raise fuel spending among eligible households. We examine the causal effect of the WFP on health outcomes, including self-reports of chest infection, measured hypertension and biomarkers of infection and inflammation. We find a robust and statistically significant six percentage point reduction in the incidence of high levels of serum fibrinogen. Reductions in other disease markers point to health benefits, but the estimated effects are not robustly statistically significant.

Suggested Citation

  • Crossley, Thomas F. & Zilio, Federico, 2017. "The health benefits of a targeted cash transfer: the UK Winter Fuel Payment," ISER Working Paper Series 2017-10, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2017-10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Alastair Canaway’s journal round-up for 28th May 2018
      by captaincanaway in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2018-05-28 11:00:22

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    Cited by:

    1. Viggers, Helen & Keall, Michael & Howden-Chapman, Philippa & Wickens, Kristin & Ingham, Tristram & Davies, Cheryl & Chapman, Ralph & Crane, Julian, 2019. "Effect of an electricity voucher on electricity use," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 134(C).
    2. Llorca, Manuel & Rodriguez-Alvarez, Ana & Jamasb, Tooraj, 2020. "Objective vs. subjective fuel poverty and self-assessed health," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(C).

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior

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