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A comparison of earnings measures from longitudinal and cross-sectional surveys: evidence from the UK

  • Francesconi, Marco
  • Sutherland, Holly
  • Zantomio, Francesca

This paper compares earnings data from the BHPS with those collected in the FRS, contrasting two different points in time (1995/96 and 2003/04), allowing us to assess the possible extent of differential attrition in the BHPS data. We perform non-parametric tests of equality at the centre of the distributions and over the whole earnings distributions. We then apply multivariate regression methods to establish whether the earnings data yield different results in relation to three typical uses of earnings data. The two surveys have fairly similar earnings data in the first comparison year, while sizable differences emerge in the later comparison. This finding suggests the important role played by attrition and ‘vintage’ effects.

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File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2009-14.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2009-14.

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Date of creation: 01 Apr 2009
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2009-14
Contact details of provider: Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Phone: 44-1206-872957
Fax: 44-1206-873151
Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Order Information: Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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  1. Richard Blundell & Mike Brewer & Marco Francesconi, 2008. "Job Changes and Hours Changes: Understanding the Path of Labor Supply Adjustment," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(3), pages 421-453, 07.
  2. Stewart, Mark B., 2002. "The Impact Of The Introduction Of The Uk Minimum Wage On The Employment Probabilities Of Low Wage Workers," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 630, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Sarah Smith & James Banks, 2006. "Retirement in the UK," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 06/140, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  4. Marco Francesconi, 2005. "An evaluation of the childhood family structure measures from the sixth wave of the British Household Panel Survey," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(3), pages 539-566.
  5. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2008. "Estimating low pay transition probabilities accounting for endogenous selection mechanisms," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 57(2), pages 165-186.
  6. Nicholas Barr & Peter Diamond, 2006. "The Economics of Pensions," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(1), pages 15-39, Spring.
  7. Disney, Richard & Whitehouse, Edward, 1996. "What Are Occupational Pension Plan Entitlements Worth in Britain?," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages 213-38, May.
  8. John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf, 2009. "How Reliable are Income Data Collected with a Single Question?," DoQSS Working Papers 09-03, Department of Quantitative Social Science - UCL Institute of Education, University College London.
  9. Giorgina Brown & John Micklewright & Sylke V. Schnepf & Robert Waldmann, 2007. "International surveys of educational achievement: how robust are the findings?," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 170(3), pages 623-646.
  10. Lumsdaine, Robin L. & Mitchell, Olivia S., 1999. "New developments in the economic analysis of retirement," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 49, pages 3261-3307 Elsevier.
  11. Mathiowetz, Nancy A & Duncan, Greg J, 1988. "Out of Work, Out of Mind: Response Errors in Retrospective Reports of Unemployment," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 6(2), pages 221-29, April.
  12. John Ermisch & Marco Francesconi, 2000. "Educational Choice, Families, and Young People's Earnings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 35(1), pages 143-176.
  13. Dayal N & Gomulka J & Mitton L & Sutherland H, 2000. "Enhancing Family Resources Survey income data with expenditure data from the Family Expenditure Survey: data comparisons," Microsimulation Unit Research Notes MU/RN/40, Microsimulation Unit at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  14. Sutherland, Holly & Piachaud, David, 2001. "Reducing Child Poverty in Britain: An Assessment of Government Policy 1997-2001," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(469), pages F85-101, February.
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