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Health, wealth and progeny: explaining the living arrangements of older European women

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  • Iacovou, Maria

Abstract

The increase in the numbers of older people across industrialised countries, and the increasing proportion of older people who live alone, have enormous implications for social policy in these countries. This paper uses data from the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) to analyse the determinants of living alone for elderly non-married women in Europe; and to examine how these determinants vary between different groups of countries. A number of methodological issues relating to research on living arrangements are also discussed. The main findings of the paper are that higher levels of income are related to a higher probability of living alone, although the relationship is S-shaped, with the main effect found in the second quartile in higher-income countries, and the third quartile in lower-income countries. Women with a limiting health problem are less likely to live alone in countries where social spending is relatively low, while women who have had more children are less likely to live alone in countries where residential mobility is relatively high.

Suggested Citation

  • Iacovou, Maria, 2000. "Health, wealth and progeny: explaining the living arrangements of older European women," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-08, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2000-08
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2000-08.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Iacovou, Maria, 2000. "The living arrangements of elderly Europeans," ISER Working Paper Series 2000-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. David F. Scott & William G. Jens & Raymond E. Spudeck, 1991. "Analysis," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(6), pages 58-60, November.
    3. Jan Mutchier & Jeffrey Burr, 1991. "A longitudinal analysis of household and nonhousehold living arrangements in later life," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(3), pages 375-390, August.
    4. Diane Macunovich & Richard Easterlin & Christine Schaeffer & Eileen Crimmins, 1995. "Echoes of the baby boom and bust: Recent and prospective changes in living alone among elderly widows in the united states," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 32(1), pages 17-28, February.
    5. Jeffrey Burr & Jan Mutchler, 1992. "The living arrangements of unmarried elderly hispanic females," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 29(1), pages 93-112, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eleni Karagiannaki, 2011. "Changes in the Living Arrangements of Elderly People in Greece: 1974–1999," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(2), pages 263-285, April.
    2. P. Albuquerque, 2009. "The Elderly and the Extended Household in Portugal: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 28(3), pages 271-289, June.
    3. Karagiannaki, Eleni, 2005. "Changes in the living arrangements of elderly people in Greece: 1974-1999," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 6246, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Eleni Karagiannaki, 2005. "Changes in the Living Arrangements of Elderly People in Greece: 1974-1999," CASE Papers 104, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
    5. Cooper, D. & McCausland, W.D. & Theodossiou, I., 2006. "The health hazards of unemployment and poor education: The socioeconomic determinants of health duration in the European Union," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 273-297, December.
    6. Joëlle Gaymu & Peter Ekamper & Gijs Beets, 2007. "Qui prendra en charge les Européens âgés dépendants en 2030 ?," Population (french edition), Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED), vol. 62(4), pages 789-822.
    7. repec:cai:poeine:pope_704_0675 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Matteo Lippi Bruni & Cristina Ugolini, 2006. "Assistenza a domicilio e assistenza residenziale: politiche di intervento e analisi empirica," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 2, pages 241-268.

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