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The Monetary Policy of the European Central Bank (2002-2015)

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  • Micossi, Stefano

Abstract

This Special Report examines the policies pursued by the European Central Bank (ECB) since the inception of the euro. The ECB was originally set up to pursue price stability, with an eye also to economic growth and financial stability as subsidiary goals, once the primary goal was secured. The application of a single monetary policy to a diverse economic area has entailed a pronounced pro-cyclicality in its real economic effects on the eurozone periphery. Later, monetary policy became the main policy instrument to tackle financial instability elicited by the failure of Lehman Brothers and the sovereign debt crisis in the eurozone. In the process, the ECB emerged as the lender of last resort in the sovereign debt markets of participating countries. Persistent economic depression and deflation eventually brought the ECB into the uncharted waters of unconventional policies. That the ECB could legally perform all of these tasks bears witness to the flexibility of the TFEU and its Statute, but its tools and operating procedures were stretched to their limit. In the end, the place of the ECB amongst EU policy-making institutions has been greatly enhanced, but has entailed repeated intrusions into the broader domain of economic policies – not least because of its market intervention policies – whose consequences have yet to be ascertained.

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  • Micossi, Stefano, 2015. "The Monetary Policy of the European Central Bank (2002-2015)," CEPS Papers 10610, Centre for European Policy Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:eps:cepswp:10610
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mirdala, Rajmund, 2015. "Exchange Rate Pass-Through in the Euro Area," MPRA Paper 68862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Micossi, Stefano, 2016. "Balance-of-Payments Adjustment in the Eurozone," CEPS Papers 11250, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    3. Engelbert Stockhammer & Collin Constantine & Severin Reissl, 2020. "Explaining the Euro crisis: current account imbalances, credit booms and economic policy in different economic paradigms," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(2), pages 231-266, April.
    4. Roumeen Islam, 2017. "Growth after Crisis in Europe: An Interdependence of Macroeconomic and Structural Policies," Cyprus Economic Policy Review, University of Cyprus, Economics Research Centre, vol. 11(2), pages 19-62, December.
    5. Micossi, Stefano & Peirce, Fabrizia, 2020. "Overcoming the gridlock in EMU decision-making," CEPS Papers 26688, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    6. Papaioannou, Sotiris, 2016. "Public spending, monetary policy and growth: Evidence from EU countries," MPRA Paper 70331, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Alvaro Fernandez-Gallardo & Ivan Paya, 2020. "Macroprudential Policy in the Euro Area," Working Papers 307121127, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    8. Mosler, Warren & Silipo, Damiano B., 2017. "Maximizing price stability in a monetary economy," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 272-289.
    9. Silvo Dajcman & Josip Tica, 2017. "The broad credit and bank capital channels of monetary policy transmission in the core and peripheral Euro Area," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 35(2), pages 249-275.
    10. Mislav Brkic, 2021. "Costs and benefits of government borrowing in foreign currency: is it a major source of risk for EU member states outside the Euro?," Public Sector Economics, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 45(1), pages 63-91.
    11. van Riet, Ad, 2017. "Monetary Policy Stretched to the Limit: How Could Governments Support the European Central Bank?," MPRA Paper 83451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Thierry Warin & Aleksandar Stojkov, 2021. "Banks’ Foreign Claims in the Aftermath of the 2008 Crisis: Institutional Response, Financial Efficiency, and Integration of Cross-Border Banking in the Euro Area," Journal of Risk and Financial Management, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 14(2), pages 1-17, February.
    13. Jean-Pierre Allegret & Audrey Allegret-Sallenave, 2016. "Intra-European Union Imbalances and Cyclical Position: Does Monetary Policy Matter?," Post-Print hal-01410832, HAL.
    14. Glocker, Christian & Piribauer, Philipp, 2021. "Digitalization, retail trade and monetary policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 112(C).
    15. Burriel, Pablo & Galesi, Alessandro, 2018. "Uncovering the heterogeneous effects of ECB unconventional monetary policies across euro area countries," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 210-229.
    16. Rostagno, Massimo & Altavilla, Carlo & Carboni, Giacomo & Lemke, Wolfgang & Motto, Roberto & Saint Guilhem, Arthur & Yiangou, Jonathan, 2019. "A tale of two decades: the ECB’s monetary policy at 20," Working Paper Series 2346, European Central Bank.
    17. Messori, Marcello & Micossi, Stefano, 2018. "Counterproductive Proposals on Euro Area Reform by French and German Economists," CEPS Papers 13438, Centre for European Policy Studies.

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