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Occupational income scores and immigration assimilation. Evidence from the Canadian census

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  • Inwood, Kris
  • Minns, Chris
  • Summerfield, Fraser

Abstract

Little evidence is available to assess the effect of substituting occupation-based income scores for individual incomes before 1940. The example of immigrant assimilation in Canada 1911-1931 reveals differences in the extent and even the direction of assimilation depending on whether income scores are used and how the occupational income score is constructed. Given the increasingly wide use of income scores, we summarize a number of procedures to address the limitations associated with the absence of individual level income variation. An adjustment of conventional income scores for either group earnings differences and/or intertemporal change using summary information for broad groups of occupations reduces the deviation between scores and actual incomes.

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  • Inwood, Kris & Minns, Chris & Summerfield, Fraser, 2018. "Occupational income scores and immigration assimilation. Evidence from the Canadian census," Economic History Working Papers 91317, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:91317
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    Cited by:

    1. William J. Collins, 2020. "The Great Migration of Black Americans from the US South: A Guide and Interpretation," NBER Working Papers 27268, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Zachary Ward, 2019. "Intergenerational Mobility in American History: Accounting for Race and Measurement Error," CEH Discussion Papers 10, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    3. Saavedra, Martin & Twinam, Tate, 2020. "A machine learning approach to improving occupational income scores," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 75(C).
    4. William J. Collins & Ariell Zimran, 2019. "Working Their Way Up? US Immigrants' Changing Labor Market Assimilation in the Age of Mass Migration," NBER Working Papers 26414, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. David Escamilla-Guerrero, 2019. "Revisiting Mexican migration in the Age of Mass Migration. New evidence from individual border crossings," Oxford Economic and Social History Working Papers _173, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

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    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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