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Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire

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  • Schulze, Max-Stephan

Abstract

This paper presents new regional GDP estimates for the Habsburg Monarchy and constructs measures of market potential for its 22 major regions. The paper argues that regional income differentials were significantly larger, that intra-empire catching-up of poor with rich regions was far more limited and that the empire’s Eastern regions were much further behind Western Europe than suggested in the historiography. The measurement of regional market potential proves strongly sensitive to the composition of foreign economies considered in the computations and the choice of regional ‘nodes’. Further, though being ‘remote’ imposed some penalty, there was no uniform relationship between changes in regions’ relative GDP position and their market potential.

Suggested Citation

  • Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2007. "Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire," Economic History Working Papers 22311, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:22311
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/22311/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro, 2000. "International Comparisons of Real Product, 1820-1990: An Alternative Data Set," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-41, January.
    7. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2000. "Patterns of growth and stagnation in the late nineteenth century Habsburg economy," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(03), pages 311-340, December.
    8. Antoni Estevadeordal & Brian Frantz & Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "The Rise and Fall of World Trade, 1870-1939," NBER Working Papers 9318, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    11. K.H. Midelfart & H.G. Overman & S.J. Redding & A.J. Venables, 2000. "The location of European industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 142, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
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    Cited by:

    1. Martinez-Galarraga, Julio, 2012. "The determinants of industrial location in Spain, 1856–1929," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 255-275.
    2. Paul Caruana-Galizia & Jordi Martí-Henneberg, 2013. "European regional railways and real income, 1870-1910: a preliminary report," Scandinavian Economic History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 61(2), pages 167-196, June.
    3. Paul Caruana-Galizia & Ye Ma, 2016. "Chinese Regions in the Great Divergence: Provincial Gross Domestic Product per Capita, 1873–1918," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(1), pages 21-45, March.
    4. Liu, Dan & Meissner, Christopher M., 2015. "Market potential and the rise of US productivity leadership," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 72-87.
    5. Henry Willebald & Javier Juambeltz, 2016. "Land frontier expansion in settler economies (1830- 1950): Was it a Ricardian process?," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers) 16-08, Instituto de Economía - IECON.
    6. Piotr Koryś & Maciej Tymiński, 2018. "Economic growth on the periphery: Estimates of GDP per capita of the Congress Kingdom of Poland (for years 1870−1912)," Working Papers 2018-02, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • B1 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925

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