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Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire

  • Max-Stephan Schulze
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    This paper presents new regional GDP estimates for the Habsburg Monarchy and constructs measures of market potential for its 22 major regions. The paper argues that regional income differentials were significantly larger, that intra-empire catching-up of poor with rich regions was far more limited and that the empire’s Eastern regions were much further behind Western Europe than suggested in the historiography. The measurement of regional market potential proves strongly sensitive to the composition of foreign economies considered in the computations and the choice of regional ‘nodes’. Further, though being ‘remote’ imposed some penalty, there was no uniform relationship between changes in regions’ relative GDP position and their market potential.

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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/22311/
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    Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History in its series Economic History Working Papers with number 22311.

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    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: Nov 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:22311
    Contact details of provider: Postal: LSE, Dept. of Economic History Houghton Street London, WC2A 2AE, U.K.
    Phone: +44 (0) 20 7955 7084
    Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/

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    1. Good, David F., 1994. "The Economic Lag of Central and Eastern Europe: Income Estimates for the Habsburg Successor States, 1870–1910," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 54(04), pages 869-891, December.
    2. Pammer, Michael, 1997. "Proxy Data and Income Estimates: The Economic Lag of Central and Eastern Europe," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(02), pages 448-455, June.
    3. Nicholas Crafts, 2004. "Regional GDP in Britain, 1871-1911: some estimates," Economic History Working Papers 22557, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    4. Prados de la Escosura, Leandro, 2000. "International Comparisons of Real Product, 1820-1990: An Alternative Data Set," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 1-41, January.
    5. Antoni Estevadeordal & Brian Frantz & Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "The Rise and Fall of World Trade, 1870-1939," NBER Working Papers 9318, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. K.H. Midelfart & H.G. Overman & S.J. Redding & A.J. Venables, 2000. "The location of European industry," European Economy - Economic Papers 142, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    7. Crafts, Nicholas & Mulatu, Abay, 2006. "How Did the Location of Industry Respond to Falling Transport Costs in Britain Before World War I?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 575-607, September.
    8. Frank Geary & Tom Stark, 2002. "Examining Ireland"s Post--famine Economic Growth Performance," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(482), pages 919-935, October.
    9. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2000. "Patterns of growth and stagnation in the late nineteenth century Habsburg economy," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(03), pages 311-340, December.
    10. Good, David F., 1997. "Proxy Data and Income Estimates: Reply to Pammer," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(02), pages 456-463, June.
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