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The Habsburg Monarchy as a Customs Union: Economic Development in Austria-Hungary in the Nineteenth Century

Author

Listed:
  • John Komlos

    () (Institute of Economic History, Department of Economics, University of Munich)

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • John Komlos, 1983. "The Habsburg Monarchy as a Customs Union: Economic Development in Austria-Hungary in the Nineteenth Century," Books by John Komlos, Department of Economics, University of Munich, number 4.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehb:kombks:4
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    Cited by:

    1. Dalibor Roháč, 2009. "Why did the Austro-Hungarian Empire collapse? A public choice perspective," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 160-176, June.
    2. Georges Ménil & Mathilde Maurel, 1994. "Breaking up a customs union: The case of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1919," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 130(3), pages 553-575, September.
    3. Marc Flandreau & Mathilde Maurel, 2005. "Monetary Union, Trade Integration, and Business Cycles in 19th Century Europe," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 135-152, April.
    4. Sascha O. Becker & Katrin Boeckh & Christa Hainz & Ludger Woessmann, 2016. "The Empire Is Dead, Long Live the Empire! Long‐Run Persistence of Trust and Corruption in the Bureaucracy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(590), pages 40-74, February.
    5. Wolf, Nikolaus & Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2005. "Harbingers of dissolution? Grain prices, borders and nationalism in the Habsburg economy before the First World War," Discussion Papers 2005/20, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    6. Heinemeyer, Hans Christian & Schulze, Max Stephan & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2008. "Endogenous Borders? Exploring a Natural Experiment on Border Effects," CEPR Discussion Papers 6909, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Max‐Stephan Schulze & Nikolaus Wolf, 2012. "Economic nationalism and economic integration: the Austro‐Hungarian Empire in the late nineteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(2), pages 652-673, May.
    8. repec:spr:anresc:v:60:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0850-5 is not listed on IDEAS

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