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Patterns of growth and stagnation in the late nineteenth century Habsburg economy

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  • SCHULZE, MAX-STEPHAN

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  • Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2000. "Patterns of growth and stagnation in the late nineteenth century Habsburg economy," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 4(03), pages 311-340, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:ereveh:v:4:y:2000:i:03:p:311-340_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Carvalho, Jean-Paul & Koyama, Mark, 2016. "Jewish emancipation and schism: Economic development and religious change," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(3), pages 562-584.
    2. Dalibor Roháč, 2009. "Why did the Austro-Hungarian Empire collapse? A public choice perspective," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 160-176, June.
    3. Michael Tomz & Mark L. J. Wright, 2007. "Do Countries Default in "Bad Times" ?," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(2-3), pages 352-360, 04-05.
    4. Dan Liu & Christopher M. Meissner, 2013. "Market Potential and the Rise of US Productivity Leadership," NBER Working Papers 18819, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Mark Koyama & Jean-Paul Carvalho, "undated". "Development and Religious Polarization: The Emergence of Reform and Ultra-Orthodox Judaism," Discussion Papers 11/11, Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2005. "An estimate of imperial Austria’s gross domestic fixed capital stock, 1870-1913: methods, sources and results," Economic History Working Papers 22325, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    7. Grosfeld, Irena & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2015. "Cultural vs. economic legacies of empires: Evidence from the partition of Poland," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 55-75.
    8. Flandreau, Marc, 2006. "The logic of compromise: Monetary bargaining in Austria-Hungary, 1867 1913," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(01), pages 3-33, April.
    9. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2015. "World Human Development: 1870–2007," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 61(2), pages 220-247, June.
    10. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/603 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Max‐Stephan Schulze & Nikolaus Wolf, 2012. "Economic nationalism and economic integration: the Austro‐Hungarian Empire in the late nineteenth century," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(2), pages 652-673, May.
    12. Rota, Mauro, 2011. "Military Burden and the Democracy Puzzle," MPRA Paper 35254, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Broadberry Stephen & Fremdling Rainer & Solar Peter M., 2008. "European Industry 1700-1870," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 49(2), pages 141-171, December.
    14. Steidl, Annemarie & Stockhammer, Engelbert, 2007. "Coming and leaving. Internal mobility in late Imperial Austria," Department of Economics Working Paper Series 768, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    15. Nikolaus Fink, 2016. "Formation and Adaptation of the Sugar Cartel in Austria–Hungary," WIFO Working Papers 508, WIFO.
    16. repec:dgr:rugggd:gd-101 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2007. "Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire," Economic History Working Papers 22311, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    18. Liu, Dan & Meissner, Christopher M., 2015. "Market potential and the rise of US productivity leadership," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(1), pages 72-87.
    19. Michel Fouquin & Jules Hugot, 2016. "Two Centuries of Bilateral Trade and Gravity data: 1827-2014," VNIVERSITAS ECONÓMICA 015129, UNIVERSIDAD JAVERIANA - BOGOTÁ.
    20. Lampe, Markus, 2009. "Effects of Bilateralism and the MFN Clause on International Trade: Evidence for the Cobden-Chevalier Network, 1860-1875," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(04), pages 1012-1040, December.
    21. Schulze, Max-Stephan, 2007. "Origins of catch-up failure: comparative productivity growth in the Hapsburg Empire, 1870-1910," Economic History Working Papers 22318, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    22. Köppl-Turyna, Monika, 2017. "Drivers of public sector growth in Imperial Austria 1870-1913," Working Papers 11, Agenda Austria.
    23. Albert Carreras & Camilla Josephson, 2009. "Growing at the production frontier. European aggregate growth, 1870-1914," Economics Working Papers 1179, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    24. repec:spr:anresc:v:60:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0850-5 is not listed on IDEAS

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