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The systemic implications of bail-in: a multi-layered network approach

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  • Kok, Christoffer
  • Hałaj, Grzegorz
  • Hüser, Anne-Caroline
  • Perales, Cristian
  • van der Kraaij, Anton

Abstract

We present a tractable framework to assess the systemic implications of bail-in. To this end, we construct a multi-layered network model where each layer represents the securities cross holdings of a specific seniority among the largest euro area banking groups. On this basis, the bail-in of a bank can be simulated to identify the direct contagion risk to the other banks in the network. We find that there is no direct contagion to creditor banks. Spill-overs also tend to be small due to low levels of securities cross-holdings in the interbank network. We also quantify the impact of a bail-in on the different liability holders. In the baseline scenario, shareholders and subordinated creditors are always affected by the bail-in, senior unsecured creditors in 75% of the cases. Finally, we compute the effect of the bail-in on the network topology in each layer. We find that a bail-in significantly reshapes interbank linkages within specific seniority layers. JEL Classification: G01, G18, G21, C63

Suggested Citation

  • Kok, Christoffer & Hałaj, Grzegorz & Hüser, Anne-Caroline & Perales, Cristian & van der Kraaij, Anton, 2017. "The systemic implications of bail-in: a multi-layered network approach," Working Paper Series 2010, European Central Bank.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecb:ecbwps:20172010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:onb:oenbfs:y:2017:i:33:b:4 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. T. R. Hurd, 2017. "Bank Panics and Fire Sales, Insolvency and Illiquidity," Papers 1711.05289, arXiv.org.
    3. Katz, Matthijs & van der Kwaak, Christiaan, 2018. "The Macroeconomic Effectiveness of Bank Bail-ins," Research Report 2018009-EEF, University of Groningen, Research Institute SOM (Systems, Organisations and Management).
    4. Kiewiet, Gera & van Lelyveld, Iman Paul Pieter & van Wijnbergen, Sweder, 2017. "Contingent Convertibles: Can the Market handle them?," CEPR Discussion Papers 12359, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Martijn Boermans & Viacheslav Keshkov, 2018. "The impact of the ECB asset purchases on the European bond market structure: Granular evidence on ownership concentration," DNB Working Papers 590, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    6. Fache Rousová, Linda & Caloca, Antonio Rodríguez, 2018. "Disentangling euro area portfolios: new evidence on cross-border securities holdings," Statistics Paper Series 28, European Central Bank.
    7. Beck, Thorsten & Da-Rocha-Lopes, Samuel & Silva, Andre, 2017. "Sharing the Pain? Credit Supply and Real Effects of Bank Bail-ins," CEPR Discussion Papers 12058, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. repec:taf:jpolrf:v:21:y:2018:i:2:p:132-143 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bail-in; financial networks; policy simulation; resolution regimes; systemic risk;

    JEL classification:

    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques

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