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What if TTIP Changed the Regulation of Public Services ?Lessons for Europe from Developing Countries

Listed author(s):
  • Antonio Estache
  • Caroline Philippe

This paper argues that the TTIP negotiators may be underestimating some of the risks associated with the treatment of public services. De facto opening the door to supranational regulation of key public services may be well intended to protect investors. But when the bargaining power of these investors operating in non-competitive markets (which is the case for most public services) becomes excessive as a result, the experience of developing countries in interactions with many of the same large players points to risks. It is likely that outcomes in terms of the usual policy criteria (efficiency, equity and fiscal viability) will not be as positive as promised in an environment in which regulation ends up weaker (because it is captured or less specialized). Ignoring these lessons and failing to internalize them in the design of negotiation is likely to cost Europe.

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/230499/3/2016-26-ESTACHE_PHILIPPE-whatif.pdf
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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number ECARES 2016-26.

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Length: 21 p.
Date of creation: May 2016
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/230499
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  1. Nagayama, Hiroaki, 2009. "Electric power sector reform liberalization models and electric power prices in developing countries: An empirical analysis using international panel data," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 463-472, May.
  2. Miguel A. Montoya & Francesc Trillas, 2009. "The measurement of regulator independence in practice: Latin America and the Caribbean," International Journal of Public Policy, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 4(1/2), pages 113-134.
  3. María Manuela González & Lourdes Trujillo, 2009. "Efficiency Measurement in the Port Industry: A Survey of the Empirical Evidence," Journal of Transport Economics and Policy, University of Bath, vol. 43(2), pages 157-192, May.
  4. Guasch, J. Luis & Laffont, Jean-Jacques & Straub, Stéphane, 2008. "Renegotiation of concession contracts in Latin America: Evidence from the water and transport sectors," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 421-442, March.
  5. Luis A. Andrés & Jordan Schwartz & J. Luis Guasch, 2013. "Uncovering the Drivers of Utility Performance : Lessons from Latin America and the Caribbean on the Role of the Private Sector, Regulation, and Governance in the Power, Water, and Telecommunication Se," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15774, June.
  6. Kundu, Goutam Kumar & Mishra, Bidhu Bhusan, 2011. "Impact of reform and privatization on consumers: A case study of power sector reform in Orissa, India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(6), pages 3537-3549, June.
  7. Florio, Massimo, 2013. "Network Industries and Social Welfare: The Experiment that Reshuffled European Utilities," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199674855, April.
  8. Gerlach, Esther & Franceys, Richard, 2010. "Regulating Water Services for All in Developing Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1229-1240, September.
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