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Regulating Water Services for All in Developing Economies

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  • Gerlach, Esther
  • Franceys, Richard

Abstract

Summary Economic regulation is being introduced into the water services sector in developing economies, where widespread poverty and service inadequacies affect regulatory rationales. This paper analyzes the regulatory experience in 11 metropolitan areas with respect to the challenge of reaching all urban consumers, particularly the poor. Case study evidence suggests that pro-poor regulatory outcomes have been constrained by inadequate framework conditions and a limited understanding of alternative providers. In many cases regulatory governance has been equally vulnerable, although some regulators have demonstrated a capacity and willingness to achieve a balance between the social and financial objectives of water service regulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerlach, Esther & Franceys, Richard, 2010. "Regulating Water Services for All in Developing Economies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1229-1240, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:38:y:2010:i:9:p:1229-1240
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mitlin, Diana, 2002. "Competition, Regulation and the Urban Poor: A Case Study of Water," Centre on Regulation and Competition (CRC) Working papers 30606, University of Manchester, Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM).
    2. Laffont,Jean-Jacques, 2005. "Regulation and Development," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521840187, December.
    3. Estache, Antonio & Laffont, Jean-Jacques & Xinzhu Zhang, 2004. "Universal service obligations in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3421, The World Bank.
    4. Omar Chisari & Antonio Estache & Catherine Waddams Price, 2003. "Access by the poor in Latin America's utility reform: subsidies and service obligations," Chapters,in: Utility Privatization and Regulation, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Philippe Marin, 2009. "Public-Private Partnerships for Urban Water Utilities : A Review of Experiences in Developing Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2703.
    6. Parker, David & Kirkpatrick, Colin & Figueira-Theodorakopoulou, Catarina, 2008. "Infrastructure regulation and poverty reduction in developing countries: A review of the evidence and a research agenda," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 177-188, May.
    7. Mark Armstrong & Simon Cowan & John Vickers, 1994. "Regulatory Reform: Economic Analysis and British Experience," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262510790, January.
    8. Graham, Stephen & Marvin, Simon, 1994. "Cherry picking and social dumping : Utilities in the 1990s," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 4(2), pages 113-119, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Estache & Caroline Philippe, 2012. "The Impact of Private Participation in Infrastructure in Developing Countries: Taking Stock of about 20 Years of Experience," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2012-043, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    2. Unesco Unesco, 2015. "Water for a Sustainable World," Working Papers id:6657, eSocialSciences.
    3. Jimenez-Redal, Ruben & Parker, Alison & Jeffrey, Paul, 2014. "Factors influencing the uptake of household water connections in peri-urban Maputo, Mozambique," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 22-27.
    4. Wutich, Amber & Beresford, Melissa & Carvajal, Cinthia, 2016. "Can Informal Water Vendors Deliver on the Promise of A Human Right to Water? Results From Cochabamba, Bolivia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 14-24.
    5. Antonio Estache & Caroline Philippe, 2016. "What if TTIP Changed the Regulation of Public Services ?Lessons for Europe from Developing Countries," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2016-26, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    6. Marson, Marta & Savin, Ivan, 2015. "Ensuring Sustainable Access to Drinking Water in Sub Saharan Africa: Conflict Between Financial and Social Objectives," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 26-39.

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