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Financing Infrastructure in Developing Countries

Listed author(s):
  • Antonio Estache
  • Tomas Serebrisky
  • Liam Wren-Lewis

This article develops a theoretical framework to analyze options for financing infrastructurein developing countries. We build a basic model that gives motivations for usinga combination of public finance, private debt and private equity. The model is thenextended in a number of ways to examine a variety of factors that are important fordeveloping countries when considering financing choices. We focus in particular on keyinstitutional weaknesses that are often important for infrastructure investment. Overall,we show that such weaknesses can be key in determining financing choices, but that theydo not all push in the same direction. Financing schemes must therefore be adapted toconsider the institutional limitations that are most pertinent in any given context.

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/196926/1/2015-11-ESTACHE_SEREBRISKY_WRENLEWIS-financing.pdf
File Function: 2015-11-ESTACHE_SEREBRISKY_WRENLEWIS-financing
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Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series Working Papers ECARES with number ECARES 2015-11.

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Length: 33 p.
Date of creation: Mar 2015
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:eca:wpaper:2013/196926
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Av. F.D., Roosevelt, 39, 1050 Bruxelles

Phone: (32 2) 650 30 75
Fax: (32 2) 650 44 75
Web page: http://difusion.ulb.ac.be

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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Kristin Komives & Vivien Foster & Jonathan Halpern & Quentin Wodon, 2005. "Water, Electricity, and the Poor : Who Benefits from Utility Subsidies?," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6361, October.
  2. Antonio Estache & Liam Wren-Lewis, 2009. "Toward a Theory of Regulation for Developing Countries: Following Jean-Jacques Laffont's Lead," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(3), pages 729-770, September.
  3. Biswa Nath Bhattacharyay, 2010. "Estimating Demand for Infrastructure in Energy, Transport, Telecommunications, Water and Sanitation in Asia and the Pacific: 2010-2020," Working Papers id:2911, eSocialSciences.
  4. Wren-Lewis, Liam, 2013. "Commitment in utility regulation: A model of reputation and policy applications," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 210-231.
  5. David Martimort & Flavio Menezes & Myrna Wooders & DANIEL DANAU & ANNALISA VINELLA, 2015. "Public-Private Contracting under Limited Commitment," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 17(1), pages 78-110, 02.
  6. David Martimort, 2006. "An Agency Perspective on the Costs and Benefits of Privatization," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 30(1), pages 5-44, 07.
  7. A. Marra & N.F. Cruz & F. Fecher & R.C. Marques & Marian MOSZORO, 2014. "Efficient Public-Private Capital Structures," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 85(1), pages 103-126, 03.
  8. Aidan Vining & Anthony Boardman, 2014. "Self-interest Springs Eternal: Political Economy Reasons why Public-Private Partnerships Do Not Work as Well as Expected," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 12(3), pages 17-23, October.
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