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Job (in)stability in the European Long-Term Care Workforce

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Abstract

Demographic changes and growing demand are making Long-Term Care (LTC) services for chronic patients and senior citizens a dynamic sector facing major challenges. Jobs in this sector tend to have limited attractiveness, to be associated with low retention rates and, consequently, potential workforce shortages. The objective of the present paper is to measure LTC job stability in order to quantify a potential attractiveness gap between caregiver occupations and other related careers across European countries. We make use of the European Labour Force Survey database (EU-LFS). The data covers 26 countries over the period 1992-2011. We estimate the conditional continuation probabilities of maintaining current job over time for LTC workers, applying a retention rates approach. We compare these estimates to those for typical health sector workers within and across-various countries. Our findings indicate that, although LTC jobs are as stable as other healthcare related occupations in most of Europe, two groups of countries exhibit different patterns. In Southern and Eastern European countries, LTC occupations appear less stable. Central European states, by contrast, reveal an apparently higher retention in favor of LTC occupations.

Suggested Citation

  • Visintin, Stefano & Elvira, Marta & Rodríguez-Lluesma, Carlos, 2013. "Job (in)stability in the European Long-Term Care Workforce," IESE Research Papers D/1078, IESE Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebg:iesewp:d-1078
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    File URL: http://www.iese.edu/research/pdfs/WP-1078-E.pdf
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    1. Neumark, David & Polsky, Daniel & Hansen, Daniel, 1999. "Has Job Stability Declined Yet? New Evidence for the 1990s," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 29-64, October.
    2. Brochu, Pierre, 2011. "Estimating labour market transitions and continuations using repeated cross sectional data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 84-87, April.
    3. Rie Fujisawa & Francesca Colombo, 2009. "The Long-Term Care Workforce: Overview and Strategies to Adapt Supply to a Growing Demand," OECD Health Working Papers 44, OECD Publishing.
    4. Stephen W. Salant, 1977. "Search Theory and Duration Data: A Theory of Sorts," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 91(1), pages 39-57.
    5. Andrew Heisz, 2005. "The evolution of job stability in Canada: trends and comparisons with U.S. results," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(1), pages 105-127, February.
    6. Roman Mennicken & Boris Augurzky & Heinz Rothgang & Jürgen Wasem, 2014. "Explaining differences in remuneration rates of nursing homes in Germany," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 15(4), pages 401-410, May.
    7. repec:zbw:rwirep:0215 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Sider, Hal, 1985. "Unemployment Duration and Incidence: 1968-82," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(3), pages 461-472, June.
    9. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Prieto, 2012. "The trade-off between formal and informal care in Spain," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer;Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gesundheitsökonomie (DGGÖ), vol. 13(4), pages 461-490, August.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Long-term care; LTC occupations; Job Stability; Retention rates.;

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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