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The source of the new Canadian job stability patterns

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  • Pierre Brochu

Abstract

This paper explores the causes of recent changes in Canadian job stability. Using the Labour Force Survey master files (19772010), I find that the increases in job stability first observed in the 1990s were, in fact, long lasting. Results indicate that compositional changes and the increased job stability of women within age and education groups play important roles in explaining the aggregate job stability patterns that emerge.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre Brochu, 2013. "The source of the new Canadian job stability patterns," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 46(2), pages 412-440, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:46:y:2013:i:2:p:412-440
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paula Garda & Volker Ziemann, 2014. "Economic Policies and Microeconomic Stability: A Literature Review and Some Empirics," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1115, OECD Publishing.
    2. Brochu, Pierre, 2011. "Estimating labour market transitions and continuations using repeated cross sectional data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 111(1), pages 84-87, April.
    3. Stephanie Lluis & Brian McCall, 2017. "Part-Time Work and Crowding-Out Implications of Employment Insurance Pilot Initiatives," Working Papers 1701, University of Waterloo, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2017.
    4. Pierre Brochu & Till Gross & Christopher Worswick, 2016. "Temporary Foreign Workers and Firms: Theory and Canadian Evidence," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1628, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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