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Private-to-private corruption

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  • Argandoña, Antonio

    () (IESE Business School)

Abstract

The cases of corruption reported by the media tend almost always to involve a private party (a citizen or a corporation) that pays, or promises to pay, money to a public party (a politician or a public official, for example) in order to obtain an advantage or avoid a disadvantage. Because of the harm it does to economic efficiency and growth, and because of its social, political and ethical consequences, private-to-public corruption has been widely studied. Private-to-private corruption, by contrast, has been relatively neglected and only recently has started to receive the attention it deserves. The purpose of this paper is to offer some thoughts on the nature and importance of private-to-private corruption; the legal treatment it receives in some of the world's leading countries; and the measures that companies can take to combat it, with special consideration of its ethical aspects.

Suggested Citation

  • Argandoña, Antonio, 2003. "Private-to-private corruption," IESE Research Papers D/531, IESE Business School.
  • Handle: RePEc:ebg:iesewp:d-0531
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    File URL: http://www.iese.edu/research/pdfs/DI-0531-E.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alchian, Armen A & Demsetz, Harold, 1972. "Production , Information Costs, and Economic Organization," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(5), pages 777-795, December.
    2. Jensen, Michael C. & Meckling, William H., 1976. "Theory of the firm: Managerial behavior, agency costs and ownership structure," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 3(4), pages 305-360, October.
    3. Vito Tanzi, 1998. "Corruption Around the World: Causes, Consequences, Scope, and Cures," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 45(4), pages 559-594, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maria Halter & Maria Arruda, 2009. "Inverting the Pyramid of Values? Trends in Less-Developed Countries," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 90(3), pages 267-275, December.
    2. Everett, Jeff & Neu, Dean & Rahaman, Abu Shiraz, 2007. "Accounting and the global fight against corruption," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 513-542, August.
    3. Ahmet Ekici & Sule Onsel, 2013. "How Ethical Behavior of Firms is Influenced by the Legal and Political Environments: A Bayesian Causal Map Analysis Based on Stages of Development," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 115(2), pages 271-290, June.
    4. Ren Li, 2013. "Media Corruption: A Chinese Characteristic," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 297-310, August.
    5. Ruth Aguilera & Abhijeet Vadera, 2008. "The Dark Side of Authority: Antecedents, Mechanisms, and Outcomes of Organizational Corruption," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 77(4), pages 431-449, February.
    6. Stelios Zyglidopoulos & Peter Fleming, 2008. "Ethical Distance in Corrupt Firms: How Do Innocent Bystanders Become Guilty Perpetrators?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 78(1), pages 265-274, March.
    7. Mohamed Charki & Emmanuel Josserand & Nabila Charki, 2011. "Toward an Ethical Understanding of the Controversial Technology of Online Reverse Auctions," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 98(1), pages 17-37, January.
    8. Carole L. Jurkiewicz & Robert A. Giacalone, 2016. "Organizational Determinants of Ethical Dysfunctionality," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 136(1), pages 1-12, June.
    9. David Hess, 2009. "Catalyzing Corporate Commitment to Combating Corruption," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 88(4), pages 781-790, October.
    10. Norman Bishara & Cindy Schipani, 2009. "Strengthening the Ties that Bind: Preventing Corruption in the Executive Suite," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 88(4), pages 765-780, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    bribery; corporate ethics; extortion; private-to-private corruption;

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