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A Framework for Analyzing Language and Welfare

Author

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  • Jacques Mélitz

    (Heriot-Watt University,CEPR,CREST,CEPII)

Abstract

The paper proposes a general model that will encompass trade and social benefits of a common language, a preference for a variety of languages, the fundamental role of translators, an emotional attachment to maternal language, and the threat that globalization poses to the vast majority of languages. With respect to people's emotional attachment, the model considers minorities to suffer losses from the subordinate status of their language. In addition, the model treats the threat to minority language as coming from the failure of the parents in the minority to transmit their maternal language (durably) to their children. Some familiar results occur. In particular, we encounter the usual social inefficiencies of decentralized solutions to language learning when the sole benefits of the learning are communicative benefits (though translation intervenes). However, these social inefficiencies assume a totally different air when the consumer gains of variety are brought in. One fundamental aim of the paper is to bring together contributions to the economics of language from labor economics, network externalities and international trade that are typically treated separately

Suggested Citation

  • Jacques Mélitz, 2012. "A Framework for Analyzing Language and Welfare," Working Papers 2012-14, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
  • Handle: RePEc:crs:wpaper:2012-14
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    Cited by:

    1. Tamara Gurevitch & Peter R. Herman & Farid Toubal & Yoto Yotov, 2020. "One Nation, One Language? Domestic Language Diversity, Trade and Welfare," Working Papers 2020-15, CEPII research center.
    2. Peter H. Egger & Andrea Lassmann, 2015. "The Causal Impact of Common Native Language on International Trade: Evidence from a Spatial Regression Discontinuity Design," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 0(584), pages 699-745, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Language; Welfare; Trade;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D60 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - General
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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