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Firewood Collections and Economic Growth in Rural Nepal 1995-2010: Evidence from a Household Panel

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  • Baland, Jean-Marie
  • Libois, Francois
  • Mookherjee, Dilip

Abstract

A household panel data set is used to investigate the effects of economic growth on firewood collection in Nepal between 1995 and 2010. Results from preceding cross-sectional analyses are found to be robust: (a) rising consumptions for all but the top decile were associated with increased firewood collections, contrary to the Poverty-Environment hypothesis; (b) sources of growth matter: increased livestock was associated with increased collections, and falling household size, increased education, non-farm business assets and road connectivity with reduced collections. Nepal households collected 25% less firewood over this period, mostly explained by falling livestock, and rising education, connectivity and out-migration.

Suggested Citation

  • Baland, Jean-Marie & Libois, Francois & Mookherjee, Dilip, 2013. "Firewood Collections and Economic Growth in Rural Nepal 1995-2010: Evidence from a Household Panel," CEPR Discussion Papers 9394, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:9394
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Adhikari, Bhim & Di Falco, Salvatore & Lovett, Jon C., 2004. "Household characteristics and forest dependency: evidence from common property forest management in Nepal," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 245-257, February.
    2. Magnus Hatlebakk, 2009. "Explaining Maoist control and level of civil conflict in Nepal," CMI Working Papers 10, CMI (Chr. Michelsen Institute), Bergen, Norway.
    3. Amacher, Gregory S. & Hyde, William F. & Kanel, Keshav R., 1996. "Household fuelwood demand and supply in Nepal's tarai and mid-hills: Choice between cash outlays and labor opportunity," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 24(11), pages 1725-1736, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Isabelle Chort & Maëlys Rupelle, 2016. "Determinants of Mexico-U.S. Outward and Return Migration Flows: A State-Level Panel Data Analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 53(5), pages 1453-1476, October.
    2. repec:eee:eneeco:v:70:y:2018:i:c:p:429-439 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:eee:ecolec:v:147:y:2018:i:c:p:62-73 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ashma Vaidya & Audrey L. Mayer, 2016. "Critical Review of the Millennium Project in Nepal," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(10), pages 1-23, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deforestation; Environmental Kuznets Curve; growth; Nepal;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • O1 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation

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