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The Dynamics of Homeownership Among the 50+ in Europe

  • Angelini, Viola
  • Brugiavini, Agar
  • Weber, Guglielmo

We use life history data covering households in thirteen European countries to analyse residential moves past age 50. We observe four types of moves: renting to owning, owning to renting, trading up or trading down for home-owners. We find that in the younger group (aged 50-64) trading up and purchase decisions prevail; in the older group (65+), trading down and selling are more common. Overall, moves are rare, particularly in Southern European countries. Most moves are driven by changes in household composition (divorce, widowhood, nest-leaving by children), but economic factors play a role: low income households who are house-rich and cash-poor are more likely to sell their home late in life.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 8889.

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Date of creation: Mar 2012
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:8889
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  1. Orazio Attanasio & Renata Bottazzi & Hamish Low & Lars Nesheim & Matthew Wakefield, 2012. "Modelling the Demand for Housing over the Lifecycle," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(1), pages 1-18, January.
  2. Todd Sinai & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2003. "Owner-Occupied Housing as a Hedge Against Rent Risk," NBER Working Papers 9462, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Artle, Roland & Varaiya, Pravin, 1978. "Life cycle consumption and homeownership," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 38-58, June.
  4. Mariacristina De Nardi & Eric French & John Bailey Jones, 2009. "Why do the Elderly Save? The Role of Medical Expenses," NBER Working Papers 15149, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Banks, James & Blundell, Richard & Oldfield, Zoë & Smith, James P., 2010. "Housing Mobility and Downsizing at Older Ages in Britain and the United States," IZA Discussion Papers 5168, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Viola Angelini, 2007. "The strategic bequest motive: evidence from SHARE," "Marco Fanno" Working Papers 0062, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche "Marco Fanno".
  7. Viola Angelini & Agar Brugiavini & Guglielmo Weber, 2009. "Ageing and unused capacity in Europe: is there an early retirement trap?," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 24, pages 463-508, 07.
  8. Chiuri, Maria Concetta & Jappelli, Tullio, 2008. "Do the elderly reduce housing equity? An international comparison," CFS Working Paper Series 2008/20, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  9. Orazio P. Attanasio & James Banks & Costas Meghir & Guglielmo Weber, 1995. "Humps and Bumps in Lifetime Consumption," NBER Working Papers 5350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Fang Yang, 2009. "Consumption over the Life Cycle: How Different is Housing?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 12(3), pages 423-443, July.
  11. James Banks & Richard Blundell & Zöe Oldfield & James P. Smith, 2012. "Housing Mobility and Downsizing at Older Ages in Britain and the USA," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 79(313), pages 1-26, 01.
  12. Angelini, Viola & Brugiavini, Agar & Weber, Guglielmo, 2010. "Does Downsizing of Housing Equity Alleviate Financial Distress in Old Age?," MEA discussion paper series 10217, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  13. Angelini, Viola & Laferrère, Anne & Weber, Guglielmo, 2010. "Homeownership in Old Age at the Crossroad between Personal and National Histories," MEA discussion paper series 10216, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
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