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Predicting recoveries and the importance of using enough information

Author

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  • Cai, Xiaoming
  • Den Haan, Wouter

Abstract

Several papers that make forecasts about the long-term impact of the current financial crisis rely on models in which there is only one type of financial crisis. These models tend to predict that the current crisis will have long lasting negative effects on economic growth. This paper points out the deficiency in this approach by analyzing the ability of "one-type-shock" models to correctly forecast the recovery from past economic downturns. It is shown that these models often overestimate the long-run impact of recessions and that slightly richer models that allow the effects of recessions to be both persistent and transitory predict recoveries much better.

Suggested Citation

  • Cai, Xiaoming & Den Haan, Wouter, 2009. "Predicting recoveries and the importance of using enough information," CEPR Discussion Papers 7508, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:7508
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Olivier J. Blanchard & Jean-Paul L'Huillier & Guido Lorenzoni, 2013. "News, Noise, and Fluctuations: An Empirical Exploration," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(7), pages 3045-3070, December.
    2. Valerie Cerra & Sweta Chaman Saxena, 2008. "Growth Dynamics: The Myth of Economic Recovery," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(1), pages 439-457, March.
    3. Granger, C. W. J., 1980. "Long memory relationships and the aggregation of dynamic models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(2), pages 227-238, October.
    4. John Y. Campbell & N. Gregory Mankiw, 1987. "Are Output Fluctuations Transitory?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(4), pages 857-880.
    5. Oscar Jorda, 2007. "Inference for Impulse Responses," Working Papers 77, University of California, Davis, Department of Economics.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. António Afonso & João Tovar Jalles, 2015. "Fiscal Episodes, Technological Progress and Market Power," Working Papers Department of Economics 2015/09, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    2. Coen N. Teulings & Nikolay Zubanov, 2014. "Is Economic Recovery A Myth? Robust Estimation Of Impulse Responses," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 29(3), pages 497-514, April.
    3. António Afonso & João Tovar Jalles, 2017. "Fiscal Episodes and Market Power," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 233-250, April.
    4. António Afonso & João Tovar Jalles, 2017. "The Price Relevance of Fiscal Developments," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(1), pages 36-50, January.
    5. Davide, Furceri & Aleksandra, Zdzienicka, 2010. "Banking Crises and Short and Medium Term Output Losses in Developing Countries: The Role of Structural and Policy Variables," MPRA Paper 22078, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Furceri, Davide & Zdzienicka, Aleksandra, 2012. "How costly are debt crises?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 726-742.
    7. Davide Furceri & Aleksandra Zdzienicka, 2012. "The Consequences of Banking Crises for Public Debt," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(3), pages 289-307, December.
    8. Bernal-Verdugo, Lorenzo E. & Furceri, Davide & Guillaume, Dominique, 2013. "Banking crises, labor reforms, and unemployment," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 1202-1219.
    9. Furceri, Davide & Zdzienicka, Aleksandra, 2012. "Banking Crises and Short and Medium Term Output Losses in Emerging and Developing Countries: The Role of Structural and Policy Variables," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(12), pages 2369-2378.
    10. António Afonso & João Tovar Jalles, 2016. "The Fiscal Consequences of Deflation: Evidence from the Golden Age of Globalization," Working Papers Department of Economics 2016/23, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    11. Philipp Heimberger, 2018. "The Dynamic Effects of Fiscal Consolidation Episodes on Income Inequality," wiiw Working Papers 147, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    12. António Afonso & Jalles, 2016. "Markups' cyclical behaviour: the role of demand and supply shocks," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 1-5, January.
    13. Romain Duval & Mehmet Eris & Davide Furceri, 2011. "The Effects of Downturns on Labour Force Participation: Evidence and Causes," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 875, OECD Publishing.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial crisis; forecasting; great recession; unit root;

    JEL classification:

    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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