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New Directions in Measuring Intergenerational Mobility

Author

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  • Güell, Maia
  • Rodríguez Mora, José Vicente
  • Solon, Gary

Abstract

In this paper we overview some recent literature that exemplify several of the cutting edges in research on intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status and highlight some cross-cutting themes. We also offer a few suggestions for future research

Suggested Citation

  • Güell, Maia & Rodríguez Mora, José Vicente & Solon, Gary, 2018. "New Directions in Measuring Intergenerational Mobility," CEPR Discussion Papers 12959, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12959
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maia Güell & José V. Rodríguez Mora & Christopher I. Telmer, 2015. "The Informational Content of Surnames, the Evolution of Intergenerational Mobility, and Assortative Mating," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 693-735.
    2. Adrian Adermon & Mikael Lindahl & Daniel Waldenström, 2018. "Intergenerational Wealth Mobility and the Role of Inheritance: Evidence from Multiple Generations," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 482-513, July.
    3. George J. Borjas, 1992. "Ethnic Capital and Intergenerational Mobility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(1), pages 123-150.
    4. Maia Güell & Michele Pellizzari & Giovanni Pica & José V. Rodríguez Mora, 2018. "Correlating Social Mobility and Economic Outcomes," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 353-403, July.
    5. Gary Solon, 2018. "What Do We Know So Far about Multigenerational Mobility?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 340-352, July.
    6. Jason Long & Joseph Ferrie, 2018. "Grandfathers Matter(ed): Occupational Mobility Across Three Generations in the US and Britain, 1850–1911," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 422-445, July.
    7. Raj Chetty & Nathaniel Hendren & Patrick Kline & Emmanuel Saez, 2014. "Where is the land of Opportunity? The Geography of Intergenerational Mobility in the United States," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(4), pages 1553-1623.
    8. James J. Feigenbaum, 2018. "Multiple Measures of Historical Intergenerational Mobility: Iowa 1915 to 1940," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 446-481, July.
    9. repec:hrv:faseco:30750027 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Simon Halphen Boserup & Wojciech Kopczuk & Claus Thustrup Kreiner, 2018. "Born with a Silver Spoon? Danish Evidence on Wealth Inequality in Childhood," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 514-544, July.
    11. Daniel Aaronson & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2008. "Intergenerational Economic Mobility in the United States, 1940 to 2000," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(1).
    12. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
    13. Kelly Vosters & Martin Nybom, 2017. "Intergenerational Persistence in Latent Socioeconomic Status: Evidence from Sweden and the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(3), pages 869-901.
    14. Gregory Clark, 2015. "The Son Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 10181-2, April.
    15. Kelly Vosters, 2018. "Is the Simple Law of Mobility Really a Law? Testing Clark's Hypothesis," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 128(612), pages 404-421, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gregg, Paul & Kanabar, Ricky, 2021. "Intergenerational wealth transmission in Great Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2021-04, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

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