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A Culture of Kinship: Chinese Genealogies as a Source for Research in Demographic Economics

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  • Shiue, Carol Hua
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    This paper discusses the use of Chinese genealogies for research on economic demography. I focus both on what is known about the genealogy as a data source, and what are the open questions for future research. Chinese genealogies contain individual level records at the individual level. With the publication of new catalogues and efforts to collect genealogies, the number of genealogies is even larger than previously thought, with most dating to the late Ming (1368-1644) and Qing (1644-1911) Dynasties. These records contain information about the Chinese population history, over a period for which there is no alternative source of information. Yet the source still remains largely unexploited. Although the work of transcribing the data is significant, and selection biases need to be carefully considered, preliminary analysis of the data for a sample of married men for Tongcheng County in Anhui Province suggests these data are a rich source of information for demographic and economics research.

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    Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 11614.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2016
    Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:11614
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    1. Carol H. Shiue, 2013. "Human Capital and Fertility in Chinese Clans Before Modern Growth," NBER Working Papers 19661, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Oded Galor & Marc Klemp, 2014. "The Biocultural Origins of Human Capital Formation," Working Papers 2014-6, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Avner Greif, 2006. "Family Structure, Institutions, and Growth: The Origins and Implications of Western Corporations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 308-312, May.
    4. Behrman, Jere & Tarbman, Paul, 1985. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility in the United States: Some Estimates and a Test of Becker's Intergenerational Endowments Model," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 67(1), pages 144-151, February.
    5. Claudia Olivetti & M. Daniele Paserman, 2015. "In the Name of the Son (and the Daughter): Intergenerational Mobility in the United States, 1850-1940," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 105(8), pages 2695-2724, August.
    6. Gary Solon, 2015. "What Do We Know So Far about Multigenerational Mobility?," NBER Working Papers 21053, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Hao Dong & Cameron Campbell & Satomi Kurosu & Wenshan Yang & James Lee, 2015. "New Sources for Comparative Social Science: Historical Population Panel Data From East Asia," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 52(3), pages 1061-1088, June.
    8. Lindahl, Mikael & Palme, Mårten & Sandgren Massih, Sofia & Sjögren, Anna, 2012. "The intergenerational persistence of human capital: an empirical analysis of four generations," Working Paper Series 2012:12, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    9. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
    10. Steven RUGGLES & Robert McCAA & Matthew SOBEK & Lara CLEVELAND, 2015. "The IPUMS Collaboration : Integratin and Disseminating the World’s Population Microdata," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 81(2), pages 203-216, June.
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