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The IPUMS Collaboration : Integratin and Disseminating the World’s Population Microdata

Author

Listed:
  • Steven RUGGLES

    (University of Minnesota)

  • Robert McCAA

    (University of Minnesota)

  • Matthew SOBEK

    (University of Minnesota)

  • Lara CLEVELAND

    (University of Minnesota)

Abstract

The Integrated Public Use Microdata Series (IPUMS)-International partnership is a project of the Minnesota Population Center and national statistical agencies, dedicated to collecting and distributing census data from around the world. IPUMS is currently disseminating data on over a half-billion persons enumerated in more than 250 census samples from 79 countries. The data series includes information on a broad range of population characteristics, including fertility, nuptiality, life-course transitions, migration, labor-force participation, occupational structure, education, ethnicity, and household composition. This paper describes sample characteristics and data structure; the data integration process including the creation of constructed family interrelationship variables; the flexible dissemination system that enables researchers to build customized extracts of pooled census samples across time and place; and some of the most significant findings that have emerged from the database.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven RUGGLES & Robert McCAA & Matthew SOBEK & Lara CLEVELAND, 2015. "The IPUMS Collaboration : Integratin and Disseminating the World’s Population Microdata," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 81(2), pages 203-216, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ctl:louvde:v:81:y:2015:i:2:p:203-216
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dem.2014.6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Andrew Halpern-Manners, 2011. "The Effect of Family Member Migration on Education and Work Among Nonmigrant Youth in Mexico," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 48(1), pages 73-99, February.
    4. Cynthia Feliciano, 2005. "Educational selectivity in U.S. Immigration: How do immigrants compare to those left behind?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(1), pages 131-152, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Carol H. SHIUE, 2016. "A Culture of Kinship: Chinese Genealogies as a Souce for Research in Demographic Economics," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 82(4), pages 459-482, December.
    2. Baudin, Thomas & de la Croix, David & Gobbi, Paula, 2017. "Endogenous Childlessness and Stages of Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 12071, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Anne GOUJON & Samir K. C. & Markus SPERINGER & Bilal BARAKAT & Michaela POTANCOKOVÀ, 2016. "A Harmonized Dataset on Global Educational Attainment between 1970 and 2060 - An Analytical Window into Recent Trends and Future Prospects in Human Capital Development," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 82(3), pages 315-363, September.

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