IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Incentives and Regional Coordination in Employment Services

  • Arjen de Vetten
Registered author(s):

    Due to yardstick competition, municipalities have financial incentives to reduce unemployment, but are not likely to cooperate with each other to have the scale advantages of a regional labour market. On the other hand, a regional public employment service, like the CWI in the Netherlands, has a higher probability and value of matching, but it lacks the incentives to exert the optimal mediation effort. This paper presents a game theoretical model that addresses the trade off between regional coordination and incentives in the mediation of unemployed in the Netherlands. The model is calibrated with information on vacancies and CWI clients for the Netherlands, in order to get an impression whether it is optimal to have a public employment service in the context of this model. Finally, various institutional settings, like a privatised employment service and a performance contract for the employment office, are considered.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.cpb.nl/sites/default/files/publicaties/download/memo190.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Paper provided by CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis in its series CPB Memorandum with number 190.

    as
    in new window

    Length:
    Date of creation: Oct 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:cpb:memodm:190
    Contact details of provider: Postal: Postbus 80510, 2508 GM Den Haag
    Phone: (070) 338 33 80
    Fax: (070) 338 33 50
    Web page: http://www.cpb.nl/
    Email:


    More information through EDIRC

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. van Ours, Jan C, 1994. "Matching Unemployed and Vacancies at the Public Employment Office," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 37-54.
    2. van den Berg, Gerard J. & van der Klaauw, Bas, 2001. "Counseling and Monitoring of Unemployed Workers: Theory and Evidence from a Controlled Social Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 374, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Dale T. Mortensen & Christopher A. Pissarides, 1999. "Job Reallocation, Employment Fluctuations and Unemployment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0421, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    4. Coles, Melvyn G & Smith, Eric, 1994. "Marketplaces and Matching," CEPR Discussion Papers 1048, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Skedinger, Per & Lundin, Martin, 2000. "Decentralisation of Active Labour Market Policy: The Case of Swedish Local Employment Service Committees," Working Paper Series 537, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    6. Burgess, Simon & Profit, Stefan, 1998. "Externalities in the Matching of Workers and Firms in Britain," CEPR Discussion Papers 1854, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Christopher A. Pissarides & Barbara Petrongolo, 2001. "Looking into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 390-431, June.
    8. Pierre Koning, 2006. "Measuring the effectiveness of Public Employment Service (PES) workers; an empirical analysis based on the performance outcomes of regional employment offices," CPB Discussion Paper 73, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    9. Peter Dolton & Donal O'Neill, 2002. "The Long-Run Effects of Unemployment Monitoring and Work-Search Programs: Experimental Evidence from the United Kingdom," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(2), pages 381-403, Part.
    10. repec:cup:cbooks:9780521551847 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Burda, Michael C & Profit, Stefan, 1996. "Matching Across Space: Evidence on Mobility in the Czech Republic," CEPR Discussion Papers 1364, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    12. Pissarides, C A, 1979. "Job Matchings with State Employment Agencies and Random Search," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 89(356), pages 818-33, December.
    13. Ashenfelter, Orley & Ashmore, David & Deschenes, Olivier, 2005. "Do unemployment insurance recipients actively seek work? Evidence from randomized trials in four U.S. States," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 53-75.
    14. Coles, Melvyn G & Smith, Eric, 1996. "Cross-Section Estimation of the Matching Function: Evidence from England and Wales," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(252), pages 589-97, November.
    15. van Ours, J.C., 1994. "Matching Unemployed and Vacancies at the Public Employment Office," Other publications TiSEM d8261d35-28fe-44bc-9c14-0, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    16. Martin, John P. & Grubb, David, 2001. "What works and for whom: a review of OECD countries' experiences with active labour market policies," Working Paper Series 2001:14, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    17. Cees Gorter & Guyonne R. J. Kalb, 1996. "Estimating the Effect of Counseling and Monitoring the Unemployed Using a Job Search Model," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(3), pages 590-610.
    18. Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 1996. "How Effective Are State Employment Agencies? Jobcentre Use and Job Matching in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 58(3), pages 443-67, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cpb:memodm:190. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ()

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.