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Early Retirement and Financial Incentives: Differences Between High and Low Wage Earners

Author

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  • Rob Euwals

    () (CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis)

  • Elisabetta Trevisan

Abstract

This paper investigates the impact of financial incentives on early-retirement behaviour for high and low wage earners. Using a stylized life-cycle model, we derive hypotheses on the behaviour of the two types. We use administrative data and employ two identification strategies to test the predictions. First, we exploit exogenous variation in the replacement rate over birth cohorts of workers who are eligible to a transitional early retirement scheme. Second, we employ a regression discontinuity design by comparing workers who are eligible and non-eligible to the transitional scheme. The empirical results show that low wage earners are, as predicted by the model, more sensitive to financial incentives. The results imply that low wage earners will experience a stronger incentive to continue working in an optimal early retirement scheme.

Suggested Citation

  • Rob Euwals & Elisabetta Trevisan, 2011. "Early Retirement and Financial Incentives: Differences Between High and Low Wage Earners," CPB Discussion Paper 195, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpb:discus:195
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Axel Börsch-Supan & Reinhold Schnabel & Simone Kohnz & Giovanni Mastrobuoni, 2004. "Micro-Modeling of Retirement Decisions in Germany," NBER Chapters,in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 285-344 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Pilar Garcia-Gomez & Titus J. Galama & Eddy van Doorslaer & Angel Lopez-Nicolas, 2017. "Interactions Between Financial Incentives and Health in the Early Retirement Decision," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 17-044/V, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Sahlgren, Gabriel H., 2012. "Work ‘til You Drop: Short- and Longer-Term Health Effects of Retirement in Europe," Working Paper Series 928, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Lorenzo Burlon & Montserrat Vilalta-Bufí, 2016. "A new look at technical progress and early retirement," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-39, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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