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Social Security and Labour Supply: the Italian 1992 Reform as a Natural Experiment

  • Ranzani, Marco

This paper provides new evidence about the effects of economic incentives embedded in the Italian Social Security system on retirement decisions. The 1992 reform is an interesting example since it was implemented when: (a) the system was very generous to retirees; (b) the demographic context was dramatic;(c) an early retirement provision, and no actuarial fairness, distorted retirement choices. I use the reform as a natural experiment and exploit its differential effect on individuals belonging to different groups, namely blue- and white-collar workers. I find evidence that Social Security wealth has a larger impact on retirement choices compared to estimates in previous studies.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/16569/1/MPRA_paper_16569.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 16569.

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Date of creation: Nov 2006
Date of revision: Dec 2008
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:16569
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  1. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security Incentives for Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7651, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Orazio P. Attanasio & Agar Brugiavini, 2003. "Social Security And Households' Saving," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 118(3), pages 1075-1119, August.
  3. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 2002. "Social Security Programs and Retirement Around the World: Micro Estimation," NBER Working Papers 9407, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Agar Brugiavini, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement in Italy," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security and Retirement around the World, pages 181-237 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Moulton, Brent R, 1990. "An Illustration of a Pitfall in Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Variables on Micro Unit," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 334-38, May.
  6. Jonathan Gruber & David A. Wise, 1999. "Social Security and Retirement around the World," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number grub99-1.
  7. Stephen G. Donald & Kevin Lang, 2007. "Inference with Difference-in-Differences and Other Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 221-233, May.
  8. Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Disability Insurance Benefits and Labor Supply," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(6), pages 1162-1183, December.
  9. Daniele Franco, 2002. "Italy: A Never-Ending Pension Reform," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Pension Reform in Europe, pages 211-262 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Agar Brugiavini & Franco Peracchi, 2003. "Social Security Wealth and Retirement Decisions in Italy," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(SpecialIs), pages 79-114, 08.
  11. Agar Brugiavini & Franco Peracchi, 2004. "Micro-Modeling of Retirement Behavior in Italy," NBER Chapters, in: Social Security Programs and Retirement around the World: Micro-Estimation, pages 345-398 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Courtney Coile & Jonathan Gruber, 2000. "Social Security and Retirement," NBER Working Papers 7830, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Baker, Michael & Benjamin, Dwayne, 1999. "Early Retirement Provisions and the Labor Force Behavior of Older Men: Evidence from Canada," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(4), pages 724-56, October.
  14. Kenneth I. Wolpin & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2000. "Natural "Natural Experiments" in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(4), pages 827-874, December.
  15. Knut Røed & Fredrik Haugen, 2003. "Early Retirement and Economic Incentives: Evidence from a Quasi-natural Experiment," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 17(2), pages 203-228, 06.
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