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Spillovers from Multinationals to Heterogeneous Domestic Firms: Evidence from Hungary

  • Gábor Békés
  • Jörn Kleinert
  • Farid Toubal

Technological and informational spillovers from multinational firms can be particularly beneficial to domestic firms especially in less developed economies. The technological superiority and management experience of foreign multinational firms yield various opportunities for learning. Yet, the importance of foreign firm’s spillovers might vary with respect to the different intensities of the linkage between the multinational and the domestic firm, the differences in firms’ absorptive capacity and their ability to face competition. We show using firm-level Hungarian data that positive spillovers from multinationals depend on the level of productivity and the exporting status of the domestic firm. Larger and more productive firms are more able to reap spillovers from multinationals than smaller and less productive firms. The export status, in contrast, is of minor importance.

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Paper provided by CEPII research center in its series Working Papers with number 2009-31.

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Date of creation: Dec 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cii:cepidt:2009-31
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  1. Frank Barry & Holger Görg & Eric Strobl, 2001. "Foreign direct investment, agglomerations and demonstration effects : an empirical investigation," Working Papers 200104, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
  2. Rachel Griffith & Stephen Redding & Helen Simpson, 2004. "Foreign ownership and productivity: new evidence from the service sector and the R&D lab," IFS Working Papers W04/22, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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  6. J. David Brown & John S. Earle & Almos Telegdy, 2006. "The Productivity Effects of Privatization: Longitudinal Estimates from Hungary, Romania, Russia, and Ukraine," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 114(1), pages 61-99, February.
  7. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik, 2004. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? In Search of Spillovers Through Backward Linkages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 605-627, June.
  8. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
  9. Girma, Sourafel & Görg, Holger, 2005. "Foreign direct investment, spillovers and absorptive capacity: evidence from quantile regressions," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2005,13, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  10. Blalock, Garrick & Gertler, Paul J., 2009. "How firm capabilities affect who benefits from foreign technology," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 192-199, November.
  11. Nigel Driffield & Max Munday & Annette Roberts, 2002. "Foreign Direct Investment, Transactions Linkages, and the Performance of the Domestic Sector," International Journal of the Economics of Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(3), pages 335-351.
  12. Holger Görg & Eric Strobl, 2002. "Multinational Companies and Entrant Start-up Size: Evidence from Quantile Regressions," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 20(1), pages 15-31, February.
  13. Sourafel Girma & Holger Görg & Mauro Pisu, 2008. "Exporting, linkages and productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(1), pages 320-340, February.
  14. Balázs, Muraközy & Halpern, László, 2005. "Does Distance Matter in Spillover?," CEPR Discussion Papers 4857, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Ronald Findlay, 1978. "Relative Backwardness, Direct Foreign Investment, and the Transfer of Technology: A Simple Dynamic Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 92(1), pages 1-16.
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