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Spillovers from Multinationals to Heterogeneous Domestic Firms: Evidence from Hungary

  • Gábor Békés
  • Jörn Kleinert
  • Farid Toubal

Firms cluster their economic activities to exploit technological and informational spillovers from other firms. Spillovers through the entry of multinational firms can be particularly beneficial to domestic firms because of their technological superiority. Yet, the importance of foreign firm's spillovers might depend on two key features of domestic firms: their productivity level and its export status. In line with theories and empirical evidence on the absorptive capacity of firms, we argue on the basis of an empirical analysis of Hungarian firms that larger and more productive firms are more able to reap spillovers from multinationals firms than smaller firms. The export status, in contrast, is of minor importance.

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Paper provided by Center for Firms in the Global Economy in its series CeFiG Working Papers with number 1.

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Date of creation: 01 Dec 2006
Date of revision: 01 Dec 2006
Handle: RePEc:cfg:cfigwp:1
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  1. Philippe Aghion & Nicholas Bloom & Richard Blundell & Rachel Griffith & Peter Howitt, 2002. "Competition and innovation: an inverted U relationship," IFS Working Papers W02/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  2. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik, 2004. "Does Foreign Direct Investment Increase the Productivity of Domestic Firms? In Search of Spillovers Through Backward Linkages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 605-627, June.
  3. Yeaple, Stephen & Helpman, Elhanan & Melitz, Marc, 2004. "Export versus FDI with Heterogeneous Firms," Scholarly Articles 3229098, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. J. David Brown & John S. Earle & Almos Telegdy, 2005. "The Productivity Effects of Privatization: Longitudinal Estimates from Hungary, Romania, Russia, and Ukraine," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 05-121, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  5. Sourafel Girma & Holger Görg, 2005. "Foreign Direct Investment, Spillovers and Absorptive Capacity: Evidence from Quantile Regressions," Kiel Working Papers 1248, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
  6. Barry, Frank & Görg, Holger & Strobl, Eric, 2001. "Foreign Direct Investment, Agglomerations and Demonstration Effects: An Empirical Investigation," CEPR Discussion Papers 2907, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  7. Blalock, Garrick & Gertler, Paul J., 2009. "How firm capabilities affect who benefits from foreign technology," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 192-199, November.
  8. Rachel Griffith & Stephen Redding & Helen Simpson, 2004. "Foreign Ownership and Productivity: New Evidence from the Service Sector and the R&D Lab," CEP Discussion Papers dp0649, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  9. László Halpern & Balázs Muraközy, 2007. "Does distance matter in spillover?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 15, pages 781-805, October.
  10. Rossitza B. Wooster & David S. Diebel, 2010. "Productivity Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries: A Meta-Regression Analysis," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(s1), pages 640-655, 08.
  11. Ann E. Harrison & Brian J. Aitken, 1999. "Do Domestic Firms Benefit from Direct Foreign Investment? Evidence from Venezuela," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 605-618, June.
  12. Holger Görg & Eric Strobl, 2002. "Multinational Companies and Entrant Start-up Size: Evidence from Quantile Regressions," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 15-31, February.
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