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Spillovers from Multinationals to Heterogeneous Domestic Firms: Evidence from Hungary

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  • Gábor Békés
  • Jörn Kleinert
  • Farid Toubal

Abstract

Abstract Firms cluster their economic activities to exploit technological and informational spillovers from other firms. Spillovers from multinational firms can be particularly beneficial to firms in less developed economies, because technological superiority and management expertise of foreign multinational firms yield various opportunities for learning. Yet, the importance of foreign firms' spillovers might vary with respect to two key features of domestic firms: their productivity level and their export status. In line with theories on the absorptive capacity of firms, we argue on the basis of an empirical analysis of Hungarian firms that larger and more productive firms are more able than smaller firms to reap spillovers from multinationals. However, the export status is found to be of minor importance once higher productivity is controlled for. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Gábor Békés & Jörn Kleinert & Farid Toubal, 2009. "Spillovers from Multinationals to Heterogeneous Domestic Firms: Evidence from Hungary," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(10), pages 1408-1433, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:worlde:v:32:y:2009:i:10:p:1408-1433
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    Cited by:

    1. Nuno Crespo & Maria Paula Fontoura & Isabel Proença, 2009. "FDI spillovers at regional level: Evidence from Portugal," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 88(3), pages 591-607, August.
    2. Damijan, Jože P. & Rojec, Matija & Majcen, Boris & Knell, Mark, 2013. "Impact of firm heterogeneity on direct and spillover effects of FDI: Micro-evidence from ten transition countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 895-922.
    3. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova, 2011. "How to Stir Up FDI Spillovers: Evidence from a Large Meta-Analysis," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1021, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Magdolna Sass & Miklos Szanyi, 2012. "Two essays on Hungarian relocations," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1223, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    5. Merlevede, Bruno & Schoors, Koen & Spatareanu, Mariana, 2014. "FDI Spillovers and Time since Foreign Entry," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 56(C), pages 108-126.
    6. Ichiro Iwasaki & Péter Csizmadia & Miklós Illéssy & Csaba Makó & Miklós Szanyi, 2012. "The Nested Variable Model of FDI Spillover Effects: Estimation Using Hungarian Panel Data," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 673-709, October.
    7. Daniela Maggioni, 2013. "Productivity Dispersion and its Determinants: The Role of Import Penetration," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 537-561, December.
    8. Békés, Gábor & Muraközy, Balázs, 2016. "Beszállítói termékek a magyar feldolgozóiparban
      [Supplier products in Hungarian manufacturing]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(10), pages 1046-1073.
    9. Zoltán Elekes & Balázs Lengyel, 2016. "Related trade linkages, foreign firms, and employment growth in less developed regions," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1620, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Aug 2016.
    10. Zsolt Csafordi & Laszlo Lorincz & Balazs Lengyel & Karoly Miklos Kiss, 2016. "Productivity spillovers through labor flows: The effect of productivity gap, foreign-owned firms, and skill-relatedness," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1610, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.
    11. Tomas Havranek & Zuzana Irsova, 2012. "Survey Article: Publication Bias in the Literature on Foreign Direct Investment Spillovers," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(10), pages 1375-1396, October.
    12. Lengyel, Balázs & Leydesdorff, Loet, 2015. "The Effects of FDI on Innovation Systems in Hungarian Regions: Where is the Synergy Generated?," MPRA Paper 73945, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Havas, Attila & Nyiri, Lajos, 2007. "National system of innovation in Hungary," MPRA Paper 67161, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Pérez-Villar, Lucia & Seric, Adnan, 2015. "Knowledge transfer in global supply chains: Multinationals in Sub-Saharan Africa," Kiel Working Papers 1994, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    15. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Tokunaga, Masahiro, 2016. "Technology transfer and spillovers from FDI in transition economies: A meta-analysis," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(4), pages 1086-1114.
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    17. Maru?a Pescu (Beca) & Camelia ?tefan (Baraba?), 2016. "The Effects of Gaps and Disparities on Economic Growth. A Study of 10 Former Socialist Countries from the CEE, Members of the EU," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 18(43), pages 592-592, August.
    18. Havas, Attila & Nyiri, Lajos, 2007. "A magyar nemzeti innovációs rendszer: Háttértanulmány az OECD 2007/2008. évi innovációs országjelentése számára
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      ," MPRA Paper 69379, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Zoltán Elekes & Ron Boschma & Balázs Lengyel, 2018. "Foreign-owned firms as agents of structural change in regions: the case of Hungary 2000-2009," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1812, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Mar 2018.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R30 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Real Estate Markets, Spatial Production Analysis, and Firm Location - - - General

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