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Overfunding and Signaling Effects of Herding Behavior in Crowdfunding

Author

Listed:
  • Svatopluk Kapounek
  • Zuzana Kucerová

Abstract

The paper employs a dynamic market-wide herding behavior measure of 117,166 lending-based campaigns in 119 online platforms in 37 countries that explores whether lenders follow each other in the whole crowdfunding market, within the groups of top platforms, within the specific category or platform, and within the specific category in the specific platform. We show that herding behavior plays an important signaling role in reducing opportunity costs if the auction does not receive enough monetary bids. Additionally, our threshold models identify significant herding behavior after funding goals are raised and highlight the controversial effects of signaling mechanisms on adverse selection in crowdfunding markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Svatopluk Kapounek & Zuzana Kucerová, 2019. "Overfunding and Signaling Effects of Herding Behavior in Crowdfunding," CESifo Working Paper Series 7973, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7973
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Herzenstein, Michal & Dholakia, Utpal M. & Andrews, Rick L., 2011. "Strategic Herding Behavior in Peer-to-Peer Loan Auctions," Journal of Interactive Marketing, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 27-36.
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    3. Stephen A. Ross, 1977. "The Determination of Financial Structure: The Incentive-Signalling Approach," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 8(1), pages 23-40, Spring.
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    5. Richard W. Sias, 2004. "Institutional Herding," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 17(1), pages 165-206.
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    12. Mollick, Ethan, 2014. "The dynamics of crowdfunding: An exploratory study," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    asymmetric information; crowdfunding; herding behavior; overfunding; peer-to-peer lending; signaling;

    JEL classification:

    • C55 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Large Data Sets: Modeling and Analysis
    • D26 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Crowd-Based Firms
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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