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The Congestion Relief Benefit of Public Transit: Evidence from Rome

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Listed:
  • Martin W. Adler
  • Federica Liberini
  • Antonio Russo
  • Jos N. van Ommeren

Abstract

We estimate the effect of public transport supply on travel times of motor-vehicle and bus users in Rome, Italy. We apply a quasi-experimental methodology exploiting hourly information on public transport service reductions during strikes. We find that a 10 percent reduction in public transit supply increases the travel time of motor-vehicles by about 1.6 percent in the morning peak. The effect on bus travel time is similar. The congestion-relief benefit of public transport is thus sizeable and bus travel time gains account for an important share of it. We also examine the welfare effects of providing bus lanes. All else given, a bus lane reduces bus travel time by at least 29 percent. We find that bus lanes are undersupplied in Rome, despite the potential costs due to reducing capacity available to cars.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin W. Adler & Federica Liberini & Antonio Russo & Jos N. van Ommeren, 2019. "The Congestion Relief Benefit of Public Transit: Evidence from Rome," CESifo Working Paper Series 7698, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7698
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Russo & Martin W. Adler & Federica Liberini & Jos N. van Ommeren, 2019. "Welfare Losses of Road Congestion," CESifo Working Paper Series 7693, CESifo.
    2. Zhang, Guozheng & Wang, Dianhai & Cai, Zhengyi & Zeng, Jiaqi, 2024. "Competitiveness of public transit considering travel time reliability: A case study for commuter trips in Hangzhou, China," Journal of Transport Geography, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    3. Hans Koster, "undated". "The Welfare Effects of Greenbelt Policy: Evidence from England," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 19-023/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
    4. Ramos, Raúl & Silva, Hugo E., 2023. "Fare evasion in public transport: How does it affect the optimal design and pricing?," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 176(C).
    5. Beestermöller, Matthias Gerhard & Jessen-Thiesen, Levke & Sandkamp, Alexander-Nikolai, 2023. "Striking evidence: The impact of railway strikes on competition from intercity bus services in Germany," Kiel Working Papers 2251, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
    6. Dong Liu & Feng Xiao & Jian Luo & Fan Yang, 2023. "Deep Reinforcement Learning-Based Holding Control for Bus Bunching under Stochastic Travel Time and Demand," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 15(14), pages 1-18, July.
    7. Hörcher, Daniel & De Borger, Bruno & Seifu, Woubit & Graham, Daniel J., 2020. "Public transport provision under agglomeration economies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    congestion relief benefit; bus lanes; public transit; strikes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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