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Implicit Preferences Inferred from Choice

Author

Listed:
  • Tom Cunningham
  • Jonathan de Quidt

Abstract

A longstanding distinction in psychology is between implicit and explicit preferences. Implicit preferences are ordinarily measured by observing non-choice data, such as response time. In this paper we introduce a method for inferring implicit preferences directly from choices. The necessary assumption is that implicit preferences toward an attribute (e.g. gender, race, sugar) have a stronger effect when the attribute is mixed with others, and so the decision becomes less “revealing” about one’s preferences. We discuss reasons why preferences would have this property, advantages and disadvantages of this method relative to other measures of implicit preferences, and application to measuring implicit preferences in racial discrimination, self-control, and framing effects.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom Cunningham & Jonathan de Quidt, 2016. "Implicit Preferences Inferred from Choice," CESifo Working Paper Series 5704, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5704
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    File URL: https://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/cesifo1_wp5704.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Cerigioni, 2016. "Dual Decision Processes: Retrieving Preferences when some Choices are Automatic," Working Papers 924, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
    2. Francesco Cerigioni, 2016. "Dual decision processes: Retrieving preferences when some choices are intuitive," Economics Working Papers 1550, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    implicit discrimination; bias; judgement and decision making; choice-set effects;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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