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Recent Regional Agreements: Why so many, why so much Variance in Form, why Coming so fast, and where are they Headed?

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  • John Whalley

Abstract

Recent years have seen a sharp growth in the number of regional agreements both concluded and under negotiation. This paper attempts to document and discuss this growth focusing on US, EU, Chinese, Indian and other agreements. The form, coverage, and content of these agreements varies considerably from case to case. The paper asks why so many, why the variation in form, and why the recent acceleration. Implications for the trading system are discussed in a final section.

Suggested Citation

  • John Whalley, 2006. "Recent Regional Agreements: Why so many, why so much Variance in Form, why Coming so fast, and where are they Headed?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1790, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_1790
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Agata Antkiewicz & John Whalley, 2005. "China's New Regional Trade Agreements," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(10), pages 1539-1557, October.
    2. Crawford, Jo-Ann & Fiorentino, Roberto V., 2005. "The changing landscape of regional trade agreements," WTO Discussion Papers 8, World Trade Organization (WTO), Economic Research and Statistics Division.
    3. Agata Antkiewicz & John Whalley, 2006. "BRICSAM and the non–WTO," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 1(3), pages 237-261, September.
    4. O. G. Dayaratna Banda & John Whalley, 2005. "Beyond Goods and Services: Competition Policy, Investment, Mutual Recognition, Movement of Persons, and Broader Cooperation Provisions of Recent FTAs involving ASEAN Countries," NBER Working Papers 11232, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrew G. Brown & Robert M. Stern, 2011. "Free Trade Agreements and Governance of the Global Trading System," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(3), pages 331-354, March.
    2. Sangeeta Khorana & Maria Garcia, 2013. "European Union–India Trade Negotiations: One Step Forward, One Back?," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(4), pages 684-700, July.
    3. Maria Gallego & David Scoones, 2011. "Intergovernmental negotiation, willingness to compromise, and voter preference reversals," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 36(3), pages 591-610, April.
    4. Yan Dong & John Whalley, 2010. "Carbon, Trade Policy and Carbon Free Trade Areas," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(9), pages 1073-1094, September.
    5. Scott L. Baier & Jeffrey H. Bergstrand & Peter Egger & Patrick A. McLaughlin, 2008. "Do Economic Integration Agreements Actually Work? Issues in Understanding the Causes and Consequences of the Growth of Regionalism," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 31(4), pages 461-497, April.
    6. Jayant Menon, 2009. "Dealing with the Proliferation of Bilateral Free Trade Agreements," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(10), pages 1381-1407, October.
    7. Ken-ichi Ando, 2011. "Economic Integration from Above and Below with the Evidence of Japanese MNEs in Europe," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume III, chapter 5 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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