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The surge of Preferential Trade Agreements across Asia: What is at stake?


  • Christian Milelli

    () (EconomiX - UPN - Université Paris Nanterre - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)


Economists along with policy makers are generally viewing trade agreements as a ‘second best' process for trade expansion and economic growth on a global scale. The current surge of Preferential Trade Agreements on a bilateral basis, particularly in Asia, is somehow challenging such common view. The following paper is grounded on updated rough facts and put forward that the standard economic approach is a bit flawed. Obviously, the outcomes and prospects for Asian countries seem much more problematic insofar as power asymmetry and discrimination are embedded in these arrangements.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian Milelli, 2005. "The surge of Preferential Trade Agreements across Asia: What is at stake?," Post-Print halshs-00139467, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00139467
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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1995. "The Politics of Free-Trade Agreements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(4), pages 667-690, September.
    2. Agata Antkiewicz & John Whalley, 2005. "China's New Regional Trade Agreements," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(10), pages 1539-1557, October.
    3. Clarete, Ramon & Edmonds, Christopher & Wallack, Jessica Seddon, 2003. "Asian regionalism and its effects on trade in the 1980s and 1990s," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 91-129, February.
    4. Arvind Panagariya, 2000. "Preferential Trade Liberalization: The Traditional Theory and New Developments," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 38(2), pages 287-331, June.
    5. Glenda Mallon & John Whalley, 2004. "China's Post Accession WTO Stance," NBER Working Papers 10649, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. O. G. Dayaratna Banda & John Whalley, 2005. "Beyond Goods and Services: Competition Policy, Investment, Mutual Recognition, Movement of Persons, and Broader Cooperation Provisions of Recent FTAs involving ASEAN Countries," NBER Working Papers 11232, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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