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Incorporating the Influence of Latent Modal Preferences in Travel Demand Models

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  • Vij, Akshay

Abstract

Latent modal preferences, or modality styles, are defined as behavioral predispositions towards a certain travel mode or set of travel modes that an individual habitually uses. They are reflective of higher-level orientations, or lifestyles, that are hypothesized to influence all dimensions of an individual’s travel and activity behavior. For example, in the context of travel mode choice different modality styles may be characterized by the set of travel modes that an individual might consider when deciding how to travel, her sensitivity, or lack thereof, to different level-of-service attributes of the transportation (and land use) system when making that decision, and the socioeconomic characteristics that predispose her one way or another. Travel demand models currently in practice assume that individuals are aware of the full range of alternatives at their disposal, and that a conscious choice is made based on a tradeoff between perceived costs and benefits associated with alternative attributes. Heterogeneity in the choice process is typically represented as systematic taste variation or random taste variation to incorporate both observable and unobservable differences in sensitivity to alternative attributes. Though such a representation is convenient from the standpoint of model estimation, it overlooks the effects of inertia, incomplete information and indifference that are reflective of more profound individual variations in lifestyles built around the use of different travel modes and their concurrent influence on all dimensions of individual and household travel and activity behavior. The objectives of this dissertation are three-fold: (1) to develop a travel demand model framework that captures the influence of modality styles on multiple dimensions of individual and household travel and activity behavior; (2) to test that the framework is both methodologically flexible and empirically robust; and (3) to demonstrate the value of the framework to transportation policy and practice.

Suggested Citation

  • Vij, Akshay, 2013. "Incorporating the Influence of Latent Modal Preferences in Travel Demand Models," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt7ng2z24q, University of California Transportation Center.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt7ng2z24q
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    1. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:255-280 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Molin, Eric & Mokhtarian, Patricia & Kroesen, Maarten, 2016. "Multimodal travel groups and attitudes: A latent class cluster analysis of Dutch travelers," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 14-29.
    3. Vij, Akshay & Gorripaty, Sreeta & Walker, Joan L., 2017. "From trend spotting to trend ’splaining: Understanding modal preference shifts in the San Francisco Bay Area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 238-258.
    4. Marsden, Greg & Mullen, Caroline & Bache, Ian & Bartle, Ian & Flinders, Matt, 2014. "Carbon reduction and travel behaviour: Discourses, disputes and contradictions in governance," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 71-78.
    5. Chenfeng Xiong & Lei Zhang, 2017. "Dynamic travel mode searching and switching analysis considering hidden model preference and behavioral decision processes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 511-532, May.
    6. repec:eee:retrec:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:2-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. repec:eee:transb:v:111:y:2018:i:c:p:168-184 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9732-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Heinen, Eva & Chatterjee, Kiron, 2015. "The same mode again? An exploration of mode choice variability in Great Britain using the National Travel Survey," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 266-282.
    10. repec:kap:transp:v:45:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9751-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:221-237 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Cherchi, Elisabetta & Cirillo, Cinzia & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios, 2017. "Modelling correlation patterns in mode choice models estimated on multiday travel data," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 146-153.
    13. Chenfeng Xiong & Xiqun Chen & Xiang He & Wei Guo & Lei Zhang, 2015. "The analysis of dynamic travel mode choice: a heterogeneous hidden Markov approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(6), pages 985-1002, November.
    14. Zhang, Junyi, 2014. "Revisiting residential self-selection issues: A life-oriented approach," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 7(3), pages 29-45.
    15. Siyu Li & Der-Horng Lee, 2017. "Learning daily activity patterns with probabilistic grammars," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 49-68, January.

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