IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/transa/v54y2013icp164-178.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Incorporating the influence of latent modal preferences on travel mode choice behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Vij, Akshay
  • Carrel, André
  • Walker, Joan L.

Abstract

Latent modal preferences, or modality styles, are defined as behavioral predispositions characterized by a certain travel mode or set of travel modes that an individual habitually uses. They are reflective of higher-level orientations, or lifestyles, that are hypothesized to influence all dimensions of an individual’s travel and activity behavior. The objectives of this paper are to understand and quantify different modality styles, and to show how the modality styles construct can be operationalized within the context of traditional models of travel mode choice. We employ the six-week MOBIDRIVE travel diary and estimate behavioral mixture models in which the modality style provides a behavioral rationale to the way in which unobserved heterogeneity is specified in the travel model. Our analysis consists of two stages: First, we explore the presence and types of modality styles suggested by the data through the means of a descriptive analysis. Next, we develop a model that captures the influence of modality styles on two dimensions of an individual’s travel behavior: travel mode choice for work tours and travel mode choice for non-work tours. The modality styles are specified as latent classes; heterogeneity across modality styles include both the modes considered (choice set) and the values of taste parameters. The modality style of an individual then influences all of his/her travel mode choice decisions for work and non-work tours. In addition, error components capture unobserved correlation across travel mode choice decisions made by the same individual. Results indicate the presence of habitual drivers who display a strong bias for using the automobile and multimodal individuals who exhibit variation in their modal preferences. Multimodal behavior is further distinguished by those who appear to be sensitive to travel times and those who appear to be insensitive. Estimation results further find that modality styles are strongly correlated with more long-term travel decisions and life-cycle characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Vij, Akshay & Carrel, André & Walker, Joan L., 2013. "Incorporating the influence of latent modal preferences on travel mode choice behavior," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 164-178.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:54:y:2013:i:c:p:164-178
    DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2013.07.008
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965856413001304
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Naveen Eluru & Chandra Bhat & Ram Pendyala & Karthik Konduri, 2010. "A joint flexible econometric model system of household residential location and vehicle fleet composition/usage choices," Transportation, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 603-626, July.
    2. Vredin Johansson, Maria & Heldt, Tobias & Johansson, Per, 2006. "The effects of attitudes and personality traits on mode choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 507-525, July.
    3. Abdul Pinjari & Ram Pendyala & Chandra Bhat & Paul Waddell, 2007. "Modeling residential sorting effects to understand the impact of the built environment on commute mode choice," Transportation, Springer, vol. 34(5), pages 557-573, September.
    4. Swait, Joffre, 2009. "Choice models based on mixed discrete/continuous PDFs," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 43(7), pages 766-783, August.
    5. Kay Axhausen & Andrea Zimmermann & Stefan Schönfelder & Guido Rindsfüser & Thomas Haupt, 2002. "Observing the rhythms of daily life: A six-week travel diary," Transportation, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 95-124, May.
    6. I Salomon & M Ben-Akiva, 1983. "The Use of the Life-Style Concept in Travel Demand Models," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 15(5), pages 623-638, May.
    7. Cirillo, C. & Axhausen, K.W., 2006. "Evidence on the distribution of values of travel time savings from a six-week diary," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 444-457, June.
    8. Ben-Akiva, M. & Bolduc, D. & Bradley, M., 1993. "Estimation of Travel Choice Models with Randomly Distributed Values of Time," Papers 9303, Laval - Recherche en Energie.
    9. Thøgersen, John, 2006. "Understanding repetitive travel mode choices in a stable context: A panel study approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 621-638, October.
    10. Swait, Joffre & Ben-Akiva, Moshe, 1987. "Incorporating random constraints in discrete models of choice set generation," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 91-102, April.
    11. Hess, Stephane & Bierlaire, Michel & Polak, John W., 2005. "Estimation of value of travel-time savings using mixed logit models," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 39(2-3), pages 221-236.
    12. Choo, Sangho & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2004. "What type of vehicle do people drive? The role of attitude and lifestyle in influencing vehicle type choice," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 38(3), pages 201-222, March.
    13. Gaundry, Marc J. I. & Dagenais, Marcel G., 1979. "The dogit model," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 13(2), pages 105-111, June.
    14. Cantillo, Víctor & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios, 2005. "A semi-compensatory discrete choice model with explicit attribute thresholds of perception," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 641-657, August.
    15. Greene, William H. & Hensher, David A. & Rose, John, 2006. "Accounting for heterogeneity in the variance of unobserved effects in mixed logit models," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 75-92, January.
    16. I Salomon & M Ben-Akiva, 1983. "The use of the life-style concept in travel demand models," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 15(5), pages 623-638, May.
    17. Schwanen, Tim & Mokhtarian, Patricia L., 2005. "What Affects Commute Mode Choice: Neighborhood Physical Structure or Preferences Toward Neighborhoods?," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt4nq9r1c9, University of California Transportation Center.
    18. Daniel McFadden, 2001. "Economic Choices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(3), pages 351-378, June.
    19. Cervero, Robert & Duncan, Michael, 2002. "Residential Self Selection and Rail Commuting: A Nested Logit Analysis," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt1wg020cd, University of California Transportation Center.
    20. Timo Ohnmacht & Konrad Götz & Helmut Schad, 2009. "Leisure mobility styles in Swiss conurbations: construction and empirical analysis," Transportation, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 243-265, March.
    21. Junyi Shen, 2009. "Latent class model or mixed logit model? A comparison by transport mode choice data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(22), pages 2915-2924.
    22. Gary Chamberlain, 1980. "Analysis of Covariance with Qualitative Data," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(1), pages 225-238.
    23. Daniel McFadden & Kenneth Train, 2000. "Mixed MNL models for discrete response," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(5), pages 447-470.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Jariyasunant, Jerald & Abou-Zeid, Maya & Carrel, Andre & Ekambaram, Venkatesan & Gaker, David & Sengupta, Raja & Walker, Joan L., 2013. "Quantified Traveler: Travel Feedback Meets the Cloud to Change Behavior," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers qt2dh952gj, University of California Transportation Center.
    2. Vij, Akshay & Walker, Joan L., 2014. "Preference endogeneity in discrete choice models," Transportation Research Part B: Methodological, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 90-105.
    3. Boeri, Marco & Scarpa, Riccardo & Chorus, Caspar G., 2014. "Stated choices and benefit estimates in the context of traffic calming schemes: Utility maximization, regret minimization, or both?," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 121-135.
    4. repec:eee:transb:v:111:y:2018:i:c:p:168-184 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:kap:transp:v:44:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9732-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Heinen, Eva & Chatterjee, Kiron, 2015. "The same mode again? An exploration of mode choice variability in Great Britain using the National Travel Survey," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 266-282.
    7. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:221-237 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Cherchi, Elisabetta & Cirillo, Cinzia & Ortúzar, Juan de Dios, 2017. "Modelling correlation patterns in mode choice models estimated on multiday travel data," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 146-153.
    9. repec:eee:transa:v:104:y:2017:i:c:p:255-280 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Marsden, Greg & Mullen, Caroline & Bache, Ian & Bartle, Ian & Flinders, Matt, 2014. "Carbon reduction and travel behaviour: Discourses, disputes and contradictions in governance," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 71-78.
    11. repec:kap:transp:v:45:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11116-016-9751-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Chenfeng Xiong & Xiqun Chen & Xiang He & Wei Guo & Lei Zhang, 2015. "The analysis of dynamic travel mode choice: a heterogeneous hidden Markov approach," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(6), pages 985-1002, November.
    13. Molin, Eric & Mokhtarian, Patricia & Kroesen, Maarten, 2016. "Multimodal travel groups and attitudes: A latent class cluster analysis of Dutch travelers," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 14-29.
    14. Vij, Akshay & Gorripaty, Sreeta & Walker, Joan L., 2017. "From trend spotting to trend ’splaining: Understanding modal preference shifts in the San Francisco Bay Area," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 238-258.
    15. repec:eee:retrec:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:2-11 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Siyu Li & Der-Horng Lee, 2017. "Learning daily activity patterns with probabilistic grammars," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 49-68, January.
    17. Clauss, Thomas & Döppe, Sebastian, 2016. "Why do urban travelers select multimodal travel options: A repertory grid analysis," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 93-116.
    18. Chenfeng Xiong & Lei Zhang, 2017. "Dynamic travel mode searching and switching analysis considering hidden model preference and behavioral decision processes," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 511-532, May.
    19. Zhang, Junyi, 2014. "Revisiting residential self-selection issues: A life-oriented approach," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 7(3), pages 29-45.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:transa:v:54:y:2013:i:c:p:164-178. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/547/description#description .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.